Trial by Dutch laboratories for evaluation of non-invasive prenatal testing. Part II-women's perspectives

Rachel V. van Schendel, G. C. (Lieve) Page-Christiaens, Lean Beulen, Catia M. Bilardo, Marjon A. de Boer, Audrey B. C. Coumans, Brigitte H. Faas, Irene M. van Langen, Klaske D. Lichtenbelt, Merel C. van Maarle, Merryn V. E. Macville, Dick Oepkes, Eva Pajkrt, Lidewij Henneman*

*Corresponding author for this work

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33 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Objective To evaluate preferences and decision-making among high-risk pregnant women offered a choice between Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing (NIPT), invasive testing or no further testing. Methods Nationwide implementation study (TRIDENT) offering NIPT as contingent screening test for women at increased risk for fetal aneuploidy based on first-trimester combined testing (> 1:200) or medical history. A questionnaire was completed after counseling assessing knowledge, attitudes and participation following the Multidimensional Measure of Informed Choice. Results A total of 1091/1253 (87%) women completed the questionnaire. Of these, 1053 (96.5%) underwent NIPT, 37 (3.4%) invasive testing and 1 (0.1%) declined testing. 91.7% preferred NIPT because of test safety. Overall, 77.9% made an informed choice, 89.8% had sufficient knowledge and 90.5% had positive attitudes towards NIPT. Women with intermediate (odds ratio (OR) = 3.51[1.70-7.22], p <0.001) or high educational level (OR = 4.36[2.22-8.54], p <0.001) and women with adequate health literacy (OR = 2.60[1.36-4.95], p = 0.004) were more likely to make an informed choice. Informed choice was associated with less decisional conflict and less anxiety (p <0.001). Intention to terminate the pregnancy for Down syndrome was higher among women undergoing invasive testing (86.5%) compared to those undergoing NIPT (58.4%) (p <0.001). Conclusions The majority of women had sufficient knowledge and made an informed choice. Continuous attention for counseling is required, especially for low-educated and less health-literate women.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1091-1098
JournalPrenatal Diagnosis
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016

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