Traumatic intrusions as worse case scenarios

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While some clinicians assume that traumatic intrusions are historically accurate revisualizations of traumatic incidents, others have suggested that these types of intrusions may represent a worse case scenario (i.e. exaggerated) version of the trauma. To explore this issue, a survey was conducted among undergraduate students (N = 189). Of the 69 respondents who had been the victim of or witness to a relatively recent trauma, 15 (22%) reported an exaggerated perception of the traumatic incident. Exaggerated intrusions were found to have more flashback qualities and tended to have a higher frequency than 'realistic' intrusions. These findings are well in line with the idea that intrusions are not necessarily veridical copies of traumatic events.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1075-1079
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume36
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1998

Cite this

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title = "Traumatic intrusions as worse case scenarios",
abstract = "While some clinicians assume that traumatic intrusions are historically accurate revisualizations of traumatic incidents, others have suggested that these types of intrusions may represent a worse case scenario (i.e. exaggerated) version of the trauma. To explore this issue, a survey was conducted among undergraduate students (N = 189). Of the 69 respondents who had been the victim of or witness to a relatively recent trauma, 15 (22{\%}) reported an exaggerated perception of the traumatic incident. Exaggerated intrusions were found to have more flashback qualities and tended to have a higher frequency than 'realistic' intrusions. These findings are well in line with the idea that intrusions are not necessarily veridical copies of traumatic events.",
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Traumatic intrusions as worse case scenarios. / Merckelbach, H.; Muris, P.; Horselenberg, R.; Rassin, E.

In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol. 36, No. 11, 01.01.1998, p. 1075-1079.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Traumatic intrusions as worse case scenarios

AU - Merckelbach, H.

AU - Muris, P.

AU - Horselenberg, R.

AU - Rassin, E.

PY - 1998/1/1

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N2 - While some clinicians assume that traumatic intrusions are historically accurate revisualizations of traumatic incidents, others have suggested that these types of intrusions may represent a worse case scenario (i.e. exaggerated) version of the trauma. To explore this issue, a survey was conducted among undergraduate students (N = 189). Of the 69 respondents who had been the victim of or witness to a relatively recent trauma, 15 (22%) reported an exaggerated perception of the traumatic incident. Exaggerated intrusions were found to have more flashback qualities and tended to have a higher frequency than 'realistic' intrusions. These findings are well in line with the idea that intrusions are not necessarily veridical copies of traumatic events.

AB - While some clinicians assume that traumatic intrusions are historically accurate revisualizations of traumatic incidents, others have suggested that these types of intrusions may represent a worse case scenario (i.e. exaggerated) version of the trauma. To explore this issue, a survey was conducted among undergraduate students (N = 189). Of the 69 respondents who had been the victim of or witness to a relatively recent trauma, 15 (22%) reported an exaggerated perception of the traumatic incident. Exaggerated intrusions were found to have more flashback qualities and tended to have a higher frequency than 'realistic' intrusions. These findings are well in line with the idea that intrusions are not necessarily veridical copies of traumatic events.

U2 - 10.1016/S0005-7967(98)00101-6

DO - 10.1016/S0005-7967(98)00101-6

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SP - 1075

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JO - Behaviour Research and Therapy

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