Toxicity, Response and Survival in Older Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Treated with Checkpoint Inhibitors

N.A. de Glas*, E. Bastiaannet, F. van den Bos, S.P. Mooijaart, A.A.M. van der Veldt, K.P.M. Suijkerbuijk, M.J.B. Aarts, F.W.P.J. van den Berkmortel, C.U. Blank, M.J. Boers-Sonderen, A.J.M. van den Eertwegh, J.W.B. de Groot, J.B.A.G. Haanen, G.A.P. Hospers, H. Jalving, D. Piersma, R.S. van Rijn, A.J. ten Tije, G. Vreugdenhil, M.W.J.M. WoutersJ.E.A. Portielje, E.W. Kapiteijn

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Simple SummaryTrials suggest no differences in immunotherapy treatment between older and younger patients, but mainly young patients with a good performance status were included in these trials. The aim of this study was to describe the treatment patterns and outcomes of "real-world" older patients with metastatic melanoma. We included 2216 patients aged >= 65 years from the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry and described outcomes of immunotherapy. The study showed that responses and severe side effects did not differ from previously reported younger populations and randomized trials, even in the oldest patients and in patients with other diseases. However, patients aged >= 75 discontinued treatment due to toxicity more often, resulting in fewer treatment cycles. We therefore conclude that immunotherapy seems to have similar effects in older patients compared to younger patients, but the impact of less severe toxicity on quality of life should be further studied as older patients are more likely to discontinue treatment.Background: Previous trials suggest no differences in immunotherapy treatment between older and younger patients, but mainly young patients with a good performance status were included. The aim of this study was to describe the treatment patterns and outcomes of "real-world" older patients with metastatic melanoma and to identify predictors of outcome. Methods: We included patients aged >= 65 years with metastatic melanoma from the Dutch Melanoma Treatment Registry. We described the reasons for hospital admissions and treatment discontinuation. Additionally, we assessed predictors of toxicity and response using logistic regression models and survival using Cox regression models. Results: We included 2216 patients. Grade >= 3 toxicity was not associated with age, comorbidities or WHO status. Patients aged >= 75 discontinued treatment due to toxicity more often, resulting in fewer treatment cycles. Response rates were similar to previous trials (40.3% and 43.6% in patients aged 65-75 and >= 75, respectively, for anti-PD1 treatment) and did not decrease with age or comorbidity. Melanoma-specific survival was not affected by age or comorbidity. Conclusion: Response rates and toxicity outcomes of checkpoint inhibitors did not change with increasing age or comorbidity. However, the impact of grade I-II toxicity on quality of life deserves further study as older patients discontinue treatment more frequently.
Original languageEnglish
Article number2826
Number of pages13
JournalCancers
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2021

Keywords

  • immunotherapy
  • melanoma
  • older adults
  • geriatric oncology
  • toxicity
  • response
  • CHEMOTHERAPY TOXICITY
  • GERIATRIC ASSESSMENT
  • COMBINED NIVOLUMAB
  • IPILIMUMAB
  • OUTCOMES
  • AGE
  • IMMUNOTHERAPY
  • SAFETY
  • COHORT
  • IMPACT

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