The role of the practice order: A systematic review about contextual interference in children

Judith V. Graser*, Caroline H. G. Bastiaenen, Hubertus J. A. van Hedel

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

9 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Aim

We aimed to identify and evaluate the quality and evidence of the motor learning literature about intervention studies regarding the contextual interference (CI) effect (blocked vs. random practice order) in children with brain lesions and typically developing (TD) children.

Method

Eight databases (Cinahl, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, Pedro, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Knowledge) were searched systematically with predefined search terms. Controlled studies examining the CI effect in children (with brain lesions or TD) were included. Evidence level, conduct quality, and risk of bias were evaluated by two authors independently. A best evidence synthesis was performed.

Results

Twenty-five papers evaluating TD children were included. One of these studies also assessed children with cerebral palsy. Evidence levels were I, II, or III. Conduct quality was low and the risk of bias high, due to methodological issues in the study designs or poor description thereof. Best evidence synthesis showed mainly no or conflicting evidence. Single tasks showed limited to moderate evidence supporting the CI effect in TD children.

Conclusion

There is a severe limitation of good-quality evidence about the CI effect in children who practice different tasks in one session, especially in children with brain lesions.

Original languageEnglish
Article number0209979
Number of pages25
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • MOTOR
  • ACQUISITION
  • RETENTION
  • SKILL
  • EXPERIENCE
  • TASK
  • INDIVIDUALS
  • VARIABILITY
  • MECHANISMS

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