The role of nurses/social workers in using a multidimensional guideline for diagnosis of anxiety and challenging behaviour in people with intellectual disabilities

A. Pruijssers, B. van Meijel, M. Maaskant, N. Keeman, S. Teerenstra, T. van Achterberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims and objectivesThis study seeks (1) to investigate the impact of the implementation of the Diagnostic Guideline for Anxiety and challenging behaviours in clients with intellectual disability' on nurses/social workers' knowledge and self-efficacy; and (2) to evaluate the role of nurses/social workers in the diagnostic process when applying the guideline.

BackgroundNurses/social workers have extensive contact with clients with intellectual disabilities. Despite this key position, the contribution of nurses/social workers to the diagnosis of mental health problems and challenging behaviours is rather limited. The authors developed the multidimensional Diagnostic Guideline for Anxiety and challenging behaviours'. In this article, the implementation of this guideline is evaluated concerning knowledge and self-efficacy of nurses/social workers, as well the role of nurses/social workers in the diagnostic process.

DesignThis study employed a comparative multiple case study design.

MethodsQualitative and quantitative research methods.

ResultsWorking with the Diagnostic Guideline for Anxiety and challenging behaviours' led to a statistically significant increase in knowledge and self-efficacy among the nurses/social workers in the experimental condition, compared with nurses/social workers in the control condition. Nurses/social workers and psychologists appreciated the more active contribution of the nurses/social workers in the diagnostic process.

ConclusionsWorking with the guideline increased the knowledge and self-efficacy of nurses/social workers, and led to more active participation of nurses/social workers in the diagnostic process.

Relevance to clinical practiceAfter following a training programme, nurses/social workers can effectively contribute to the diagnostic process in clients with anxiety and related challenging behaviours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1955-1965
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Nursing
Volume24
Issue number13-14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2015

Keywords

  • anxiety
  • challenging behaviours
  • guidelines
  • intellectual disabilities
  • nurses
  • social workers
  • TRAINING STAFF
  • SELF-EFFICACY
  • ADULTS
  • KNOWLEDGE
  • OUTCOMES

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