The Right to Adequate Housing of Battered Women: The added value of the Istanbul Convention

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterAcademic

Abstract

When the main human rights instruments that contain the right to adequate housing were drafted, there was no specific attention for women’s perspective, let alone for the perspective of women in abusive relationships. The question arises whether the Istanbul Convention is capable of changing this situation by offering battered women better protection and support services. In order to answer this question, first the content of the right to adequate housing is examined. Next, the different solutions offered to women victims of domestic violence are debated, i.e. sending battered women to shelters, and evicting the perpetrator from the family residence, as well as the housing situation of domestic violence survivors. Subsequently, current international attention for the link between domestic violence and the right to housing is explored. Finally, the potential of the Istanbul Convention is examined - including the role that GREVIO can play - in protecting and safeguarding the right to adequate housing of battered women.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInternational Law and Violence Against Women
Subtitle of host publicationEurope and the Istanbul Convention
EditorsJohanna Niemi, Lourdes Peroni, Vladislava Stoyanova
Place of PublicationLondon and New York
PublisherRoutledge/Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter9
Pages191-207
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9780429289736
ISBN (Print)9780367257668
Publication statusPublished - 8 Mar 2020

Publication series

SeriesRoutledge Research in Human Rights Law

Keywords

  • Violence against women, Istanbul Convention, domestic violence, housing

Cite this

Westendorp, I. (2020). The Right to Adequate Housing of Battered Women: The added value of the Istanbul Convention. In J. Niemi, L. Peroni, & V. Stoyanova (Eds.), International Law and Violence Against Women: Europe and the Istanbul Convention (pp. 191-207). Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group. Routledge Research in Human Rights Law