The relation between mood, activity, and interaction in long-term dementia care

Hanneke C. Beerens*, Sandra M. G. Zwakhalen, Hilde Verbeek, Frans E. S. Tan, Shahab Jolani, Murna Downs, Bram de Boer, Dirk Ruwaard, Jan P. H. Hamers

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: The aim of the study is to identify the degree of association between mood, activity engagement, activity location, and social interaction during everyday life of people with dementia (PwD) living in long-term care facilities.Method: An observational study using momentary assessments was conducted. For all 115 participants, 84 momentary assessments of mood, engagement in activity, location during activity, and social interaction were carried out by a researcher using the tablet-based Maastricht Electronic Daily Life Observation-tool.Results: A total of 9660 momentary assessments were completed. The mean age of the 115 participants was 84 and most (75%) were women. A negative, neutral, or positive mood was recorded during 2%, 25%, and 73% of the observations, respectively. Positive mood was associated with engagement in activities, doing activities outside, and social interaction. The type of activity was less important for mood than the fact that PwD were engaged in an activity. Low mood was evident when PwD attempted to have social interaction but received no response.Conclusion: Fulfilling PwD's need for occupation and social interaction is consistent with a person-centred dementia care focus and should have priority in dementia care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-32
Number of pages7
JournalAging & Mental Health
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Dementia
  • long-term care
  • observations
  • quality of life
  • mood
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • NURSING-HOME RESIDENTS
  • DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL INTERVENTION
  • PEOPLE
  • PREVALENCE
  • ENGAGEMENT
  • DISEASE
  • CAREGIVERS
  • CHALLENGES

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