The prestimulus default mode network state predicts cognitive task performance levels on a mental rotation task

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Linking individual task performance to preceding, regional brain activation is an ongoing goal of neuroscientific research. Recently, it could be shown that the activation and connectivity within large-scale brain networks prior to task onset influence performance levels. More specifically, prestimulus default mode network (DMN) effects have been linked to performance levels in sensory near-threshold tasks, as well as cognitive tasks. However, it still remains uncertain how the DMN state preceding cognitive tasks affects performance levels when the period between task trials is long and flexible, allowing participants to engage in different cognitive states.

METHODS: We here investigated whether the prestimulus activation and within-network connectivity of the DMN are predictive of the correctness and speed of task performance levels on a cognitive (match-to-sample) mental rotation task, employing a sparse event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design.

RESULTS: We found that prestimulus activation in the DMN predicted the speed of correct trials, with a higher amplitude preceding correct fast response trials compared to correct slow response trials. Moreover, we found higher connectivity within the DMN before incorrect trials compared to correct trials.

CONCLUSION: These results indicate that pre-existing activation and connectivity states within the DMN influence task performance on cognitive tasks, both effecting the correctness and speed of task execution. The findings support existing theories and empirical work on relating mind-wandering and cognitive task performance to the DMN and expand these by establishing a relationship between the prestimulus DMN state and the speed of cognitive task performance.

Original languageEnglish
Article number01034
Pages (from-to)e01034
Number of pages10
JournalBrain and Behavior
Volume8
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Journal Article
  • ATTENTION
  • ERRORS
  • FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY
  • HUMANS
  • prestimulus connectivity
  • PERCEPTION
  • prestimulus activation
  • ACTIVITY FLUCTUATIONS
  • cognitive task performance
  • mental rotation task
  • default mode network
  • CORTICES
  • BRAIN
  • FMRI

Cite this

@article{1f862781e6784ad0b60a2de4b7756f03,
title = "The prestimulus default mode network state predicts cognitive task performance levels on a mental rotation task",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Linking individual task performance to preceding, regional brain activation is an ongoing goal of neuroscientific research. Recently, it could be shown that the activation and connectivity within large-scale brain networks prior to task onset influence performance levels. More specifically, prestimulus default mode network (DMN) effects have been linked to performance levels in sensory near-threshold tasks, as well as cognitive tasks. However, it still remains uncertain how the DMN state preceding cognitive tasks affects performance levels when the period between task trials is long and flexible, allowing participants to engage in different cognitive states.METHODS: We here investigated whether the prestimulus activation and within-network connectivity of the DMN are predictive of the correctness and speed of task performance levels on a cognitive (match-to-sample) mental rotation task, employing a sparse event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design.RESULTS: We found that prestimulus activation in the DMN predicted the speed of correct trials, with a higher amplitude preceding correct fast response trials compared to correct slow response trials. Moreover, we found higher connectivity within the DMN before incorrect trials compared to correct trials.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that pre-existing activation and connectivity states within the DMN influence task performance on cognitive tasks, both effecting the correctness and speed of task execution. The findings support existing theories and empirical work on relating mind-wandering and cognitive task performance to the DMN and expand these by establishing a relationship between the prestimulus DMN state and the speed of cognitive task performance.",
keywords = "Journal Article, ATTENTION, ERRORS, FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY, HUMANS, prestimulus connectivity, PERCEPTION, prestimulus activation, ACTIVITY FLUCTUATIONS, cognitive task performance, mental rotation task, default mode network, CORTICES, BRAIN, FMRI",
author = "Tabea Kamp and Bettina Sorger and Caroline Benjamins and Lars Hausfeld and Rainer Goebel",
note = "{\circledC} 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1002/brb3.1034",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "e01034",
journal = "Brain and Behavior",
issn = "2162-3279",
publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The prestimulus default mode network state predicts cognitive task performance levels on a mental rotation task

AU - Kamp, Tabea

AU - Sorger, Bettina

AU - Benjamins, Caroline

AU - Hausfeld, Lars

AU - Goebel, Rainer

N1 - © 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

PY - 2018/8

Y1 - 2018/8

N2 - BACKGROUND: Linking individual task performance to preceding, regional brain activation is an ongoing goal of neuroscientific research. Recently, it could be shown that the activation and connectivity within large-scale brain networks prior to task onset influence performance levels. More specifically, prestimulus default mode network (DMN) effects have been linked to performance levels in sensory near-threshold tasks, as well as cognitive tasks. However, it still remains uncertain how the DMN state preceding cognitive tasks affects performance levels when the period between task trials is long and flexible, allowing participants to engage in different cognitive states.METHODS: We here investigated whether the prestimulus activation and within-network connectivity of the DMN are predictive of the correctness and speed of task performance levels on a cognitive (match-to-sample) mental rotation task, employing a sparse event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design.RESULTS: We found that prestimulus activation in the DMN predicted the speed of correct trials, with a higher amplitude preceding correct fast response trials compared to correct slow response trials. Moreover, we found higher connectivity within the DMN before incorrect trials compared to correct trials.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that pre-existing activation and connectivity states within the DMN influence task performance on cognitive tasks, both effecting the correctness and speed of task execution. The findings support existing theories and empirical work on relating mind-wandering and cognitive task performance to the DMN and expand these by establishing a relationship between the prestimulus DMN state and the speed of cognitive task performance.

AB - BACKGROUND: Linking individual task performance to preceding, regional brain activation is an ongoing goal of neuroscientific research. Recently, it could be shown that the activation and connectivity within large-scale brain networks prior to task onset influence performance levels. More specifically, prestimulus default mode network (DMN) effects have been linked to performance levels in sensory near-threshold tasks, as well as cognitive tasks. However, it still remains uncertain how the DMN state preceding cognitive tasks affects performance levels when the period between task trials is long and flexible, allowing participants to engage in different cognitive states.METHODS: We here investigated whether the prestimulus activation and within-network connectivity of the DMN are predictive of the correctness and speed of task performance levels on a cognitive (match-to-sample) mental rotation task, employing a sparse event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design.RESULTS: We found that prestimulus activation in the DMN predicted the speed of correct trials, with a higher amplitude preceding correct fast response trials compared to correct slow response trials. Moreover, we found higher connectivity within the DMN before incorrect trials compared to correct trials.CONCLUSION: These results indicate that pre-existing activation and connectivity states within the DMN influence task performance on cognitive tasks, both effecting the correctness and speed of task execution. The findings support existing theories and empirical work on relating mind-wandering and cognitive task performance to the DMN and expand these by establishing a relationship between the prestimulus DMN state and the speed of cognitive task performance.

KW - Journal Article

KW - ATTENTION

KW - ERRORS

KW - FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY

KW - HUMANS

KW - prestimulus connectivity

KW - PERCEPTION

KW - prestimulus activation

KW - ACTIVITY FLUCTUATIONS

KW - cognitive task performance

KW - mental rotation task

KW - default mode network

KW - CORTICES

KW - BRAIN

KW - FMRI

U2 - 10.1002/brb3.1034

DO - 10.1002/brb3.1034

M3 - Article

C2 - 29934977

VL - 8

SP - e01034

JO - Brain and Behavior

JF - Brain and Behavior

SN - 2162-3279

IS - 8

M1 - 01034

ER -