The power of self-efficacy change during service provision: making your customers feel better about themselves pays off

J.W.A. van Beuningen, J.C. de Ruyter, M.G.M. Wetzels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The study focuses on a new service benefit derived from service usage, that is, self-efficacy increase, rather than self-efficacy evaluations as such. The authors propose that this benefit, which refers to feeling better about oneself while consuming a service, will reflect positively on service outcomes. The authors argue that self-efficacy can develop differently over time and this should be investigated to explain service evaluations more fully. Therefore, the authors separate effects related to self-efficacy level and change on value. Results show that the increase of customers' self-beliefs in their capabilities during information search positively affects perceived value irrespective of self-efficacy levels or other costs and benefits. Self-efficacy increase is predicted by a firm's strategic choice to help customers learn, the firm's tactic to provide high-quality information, and the customers' level of cognitive effort. In sum, the authors show that by fostering customers' self-efficacy build up, firms can provide a more valuable and satisfying service experience.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)108-125
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Service Research
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Keywords

  • self-efficacy increase
  • service benefits
  • perceived value
  • growth mixture modeling
  • PERFORMANCE SPIRALS
  • MODELING APPROACH
  • DYNAMIC-MODEL
  • ROLE CLARITY
  • SATISFACTION
  • QUALITY
  • MIXTURE
  • INFORMATION
  • BEHAVIOR
  • PERSPECTIVE

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