The Potential of Stereotactic-EEG for Brain-Computer Interfaces: Current Progress and Future Directions

Christian Herff*, Dean J. Krusienski, Pieter Kubben

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

31 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Stereotactic electroencephalogaphy (sEEG) utilizes localized, penetrating depth electrodes to measure electrophysiological brain activity. It is most commonly used in the identification of epileptogenic zones in cases of refractory epilepsy. The implanted electrodes generally provide a sparse sampling of a unique set of brain regions including deeper brain structures such as hippocampus, amygdala and insula that cannot be captured by superficial measurement modalities such as electrocorticography (ECoG). Despite the overlapping clinical application and recent progress in decoding of ECoG for Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs), sEEG has thus far received comparatively little attention for BCI decoding. Additionally, the success of the related deep-brain stimulation (DBS) implants bodes well for the potential for chronic sEEG applications. This article provides an overview of sEEG technology, BCI-related research, and prospective future directions of sEEG for long-term BCI applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article number123
Number of pages8
JournalFrontiers in Neuroscience
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Feb 2020

Keywords

  • electrocorticography
  • ECoG
  • brain-computer interface
  • BCI
  • stereotactic EEG
  • depth electrodes
  • intracranial
  • iEEG
  • LOCAL-FIELD POTENTIALS
  • GAMMA OSCILLATIONS
  • INTRACRANIAL EEG
  • STIMULATION
  • SAFETY
  • SPOKEN
  • COMMUNICATION
  • TETRAPLEGIA
  • METHODOLOGY
  • ACCURACY

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