The position of functional foods and supplements with a serum LDL-C lowering effect in the spectrum ranging from universal to care-related CVD risk management

Sabine Baumgartner*, Eric Bruckert, Antonio Gallo, Jogchum Plat

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

A wealth of data demonstrates a causal link between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Any decrease in serum LDL-C concentrations is associated with a decreased CVD risk, and this benefit is similar to a comparable LDL-C reduction after drug treatment and dietary intervention. Moreover, life-long reductions in serum LDL-C levels have a large impact on CVD risk and a long-term dietary enrichment with functional foods or supplements with a proven LDL lowering efficacy is therefore a feasible and efficient approach to decrease future CVD risk.

Functional foods with an LDL-C lowering effect can improve health and/or a reduce the risk of disease. However, it has not been mentioned specifically whether this concerns mainly universal prevention or whether this can also be applied to the hierarchy towards care related prevention. Therefore, we here describe the effects of a list of interesting functional food ingredients with proven benefit in LDL-C lowering. In addition, we pay particular attention to the emerging evidence that the addition of these functional ingredients and supplements is advisable as universal and selective prevention in the general population. Moreover, functional ingredients and supplements are also helpful in care related prevention, i.e. in patients with elevated LDL-C concentrations who are statin-intolerant or are not able to achieve their LDL-C target levels. Furthermore, we will highlight practical aspects regarding the use of functional foods with an LDL-C lowering effect, such as the increasing importance of shared decision making of medical doctors and dieticians with patients to ensure proper empowerment and better adherence to dietary approaches. In addition, we will address costs issues related to the use of these functional foods, which might be a barrier in some populations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)116-123
Number of pages8
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume311
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

Keywords

  • Functional food
  • Plant stanol
  • Plant sterol
  • Red yeast rice
  • Soy
  • Probiotics
  • Berberine
  • Dietary fiber
  • LDL-C
  • DENSITY-LIPOPROTEIN CHOLESTEROL
  • PLANT STEROL
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIC PATIENTS
  • 000 PARTICIPANTS
  • PLASMA LDL
  • METAANALYSIS
  • BERBERINE
  • SAFETY
  • EFFICACY

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