The Perceived Impact of Trauma-Focused Research on Forensic Psychiatric Patients With Lifetime Victimization Histories

Ilvy Goossens, Tonia L Nicholls, Iris Torchalla, Johann Brink, Corine de Ruiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the perceived costs, benefits, and motivations for participating in individual trauma-focused interviews among forensic psychiatric patients (N = 74). The majority of our participants were male, and 100% endorsed adverse childhood experiences (e.g., abuse, neglect) or exposure to potentially traumatic events (e.g., assault). Levels of posttraumatic avoidance (41.9%), reexperiencing (59.5%), and increased arousal (51.3%) were high. In line with previous studies, our findings suggest an overall positive research experience in this sample. In spite of extensive histories of lifetime victimization we did not find an association between victimization, posttraumatic symptomatology, and a negative research experience. Our findings suggest that participation in trauma-focused research is not only possible with, but also potentially beneficial for forensic patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)334-345
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2016

Keywords

  • trauma-focused research
  • victimization
  • forensic
  • PTSD
  • research impact
  • research burden
  • mental illness
  • POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER
  • ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES
  • SEVERE MENTAL-ILLNESS
  • SEXUAL-ABUSE
  • PREVALENCE
  • VIOLENCE
  • ADULTS
  • PARTICIPATION
  • POPULATION
  • SURVIVORS

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