The neural correlates of movement intentions: a pilot study comparing hypnotic and simulated paralysis

V.U. Ludwig, J. Seitz, C. Schonfeldt-Lecuona, A. Hose, B. Abler, G. Hole, R. Goebel, H. Walter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The distinct feeling of wanting to act and thereby causing our own actions is crucial to our self-perception as free human agents. Disturbances of the link between intention and action occur in several disorders. Little is known, however, about the neural correlates of wanting or intending to act. To investigate these for simple voluntary movements, we used a paradigm involving hypnotic paralysis and functional magnetic resonance imaging. Eight healthy women were instructed to sequentially perform left and right hand movements during a normal condition, as well as during simulated weakness, simulated paralysis and hypnotic paralysis of the right hand. Right frontopolar cortex was selectively hypoactivated for attempted right hand movement during simulated paralysis while it was active in all other conditions. Since simulated paralysis was the only condition lacking an intention to move, the activation in frontopolar cortex might be related to the intention or volition to move.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)158-170
Number of pages13
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume35
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2015

Keywords

  • COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE
  • CONSCIOUS INTENTION
  • Conversion disorder
  • ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION
  • HUMAN BRAIN
  • HYPNOSIS
  • Hypnosis
  • Intention
  • MOTOR CONVERSION DISORDER
  • Motor control
  • PARIETAL CORTEX
  • PREFRONTAL CORTEX
  • Prefrontal cortex
  • SELF-CONTROL
  • VOLUNTARY MOVEMENT
  • Volition

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