The Mother-Infant Study Cohort (MISC): Methodology, challenges, and baseline characteristics

Hadia Radwan*, Mona Hashim, Reyad Shaker Obaid, Hayder Hasan, Farah Naja, Hessa Al Ghazal, Hamid Jan Jan Mohamed, Rana Rizk, Marwa Al Hilali, Rana Rayess, Ghamra Izzaldin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background The United Arab Emirates (UAE) exhibits alarming high prevalence of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) and their risk factors. Emerging evidence highlighted the role of maternal and early child nutrition in preventing later-onset NCDs. The objectives of this article are to describe the design and methodology of the first Mother and Infant Study Cohort (MISC) in UAE; present the baseline demographic characteristics of the study participants; and discuss the challenges of the cohort and their respective responding strategies. Methods The MISC is an ongoing two-year prospective cohort study which recruited Arab pregnant women in their third trimester from prenatal clinics in Dubai, Sharjah and Ajman. Participants will be interviewed six times (once during pregnancy, at delivery, and at 2, 6, 12 and 24months postpartum). Perinatal information is obtained from hospital records. Collected data include socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle, dietary intake and anthropometry; infant feeding practices, cognitive development; along with maternal and infant blood profile and breast milk profile. Results The preliminary results reported that 256 completed baseline assessment (mean age: 30.5 +/- 6.0 years; 76.6% multiparous; about 60% were either overweight or obese before pregnancy). The prevalence of gestational diabetes was 19.2%. Upon delivery, 208 womeninfant pairs were retained (mean gestational age: 38.5 +/- 1.5 weeks; 33.3% caesarean section delivery; 5.3% low birthweight; 5.7% macrosomic deliveries). Besides participant retention,the main encountered challenges pertained to cultural complexity, underestimation the necessary start-up time, staff, and costs, and biochemical data collection. Conclusions Despite numerous methodological, logistical and sociocultural challenges, satisfactory follow-up rates are recorded. Strategies addressing challenges are documented, providing information for planning and implementing future birth cohort studies locally and internationally.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0198278
Number of pages20
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2018

Keywords

  • BREAST-FEEDING DURATION
  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • 1ST 1,000 DAYS
  • BIRTH COHORT
  • ADIPONECTIN LEVELS
  • RISK-FACTORS
  • HUMAN-MILK
  • DEVELOPMENTAL ORIGINS
  • LONGITUDINAL COHORT
  • CHILDHOOD OBESITY

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