The Memory-Undermining Effect of Simulated Crime-Related Amnesia and Its Legal Implications: a Review

I. Mangiulli*, P. Riesthuis, H. Otgaar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

Abstract

Pretending to suffer from amnesia for a mock crime has been shown to lead to memory impairments. Specifically, when people are asked to give up their role of simulators, they typically recall fewer crime-relevant details than those who initially confess to a crime. In the current review, we amassed all experimental work on this subject and assessed the characteristics of the memory-undermining effect of simulated amnesia for a crime procedure (i.e., crime stimuli, simulating amnesia instructions, memory tests, and memory outcomes). We specifically focused on the effect that crime-related amnesia claims may have on offenders' final memory reports. Our review showed that simulators who initially claimed amnesia might paradoxically experience some sort of forgetting pertaining to crime-related information. This issue could likely lead to legal complications that need be taken into account in crime-related amnesia cases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-226
Number of pages14
JournalPsychological Injury and Law
Volume15
Issue number2
Early online date21 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2022

Keywords

  • Crime-related amnesia
  • Malingering
  • Simulating amnesia effect
  • Memory impairments
  • Legal implications
  • NEURAL MECHANISMS
  • CRIMINAL OFFENSES
  • INFORMATION
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • CLAIMS
  • ABUSE

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Memory-Undermining Effect of Simulated Crime-Related Amnesia and Its Legal Implications: a Review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this