The mediating role of rumination in the relation between quality of attachment relations and depressive symptoms in non-clinical adolescents

T. Ruijten, J. Roelofs, L. Rood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined associations between indices of the quality of attachment relationships of adolescents with parents and peers, rumination, and symptoms of depression. More specifically, a mediation model was investigated in which rumination was hypothesized to mediate the relation between quality of attachment relations and symptoms of depression. A total of 455 high school students completed a battery of questionnaires, including quality of attachment relations, rumination, and depression. Results showed that most indices of quality of attachment relations were significantly associated with rumination and symptoms of depression. When examining the relative contribution of these variables in explaining variance in depression symptoms, trust in parents, communication with peers, and alienation from peers accounted for a significant portion of the variance in depression scores. Finally, the relation between communication with peers and depressive symptoms was fully mediated by rumination, whereas partial mediation was found for the relations between parental trust and depressive symptoms, and between alienation from peers and depressive symptoms. Implications of the findings may be that the treatment of depression in adolescence should consist of both cognitive interventions aimed at targeting ruminative thinking as well as a focus on interpersonal relationships of the adolescent with parents and peers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)452-459
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child and Family Studies
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Attachment
  • Depression
  • Rumination
  • PEER ATTACHMENT
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • CO-RUMINATION
  • CHILDHOOD
  • PARENT
  • INVENTORY
  • CHILDREN
  • PSYCHOTHERAPY
  • FRIENDSHIPS
  • ADULTHOOD

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