The influence of group size and stigma severity on social acceptance: The case of people with intellectual disability moving into neighbourhoods

L.M. van Alphen, A.J.M. Dijker, A.E.R. Bos, B.H.W. van den Borne, L.M.G. Curfs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Dutch adults from a nationwide Internet panel (N=426) were asked to imagine that their next-door neighbours would move out and that people with intellectual disability would move in. Severity of disability and group size were varied to manipulate intergroup threat. These two factors independently influenced social acceptance and a variety of emotional and behavioural measures. In particular, it was found that a large group with severe disability aroused the strongest negative response, whereas a small group with mild disability aroused the weakest negative response. Small groups with a severe disability and large groups with a mild disability aroused similar and intermediate negative responses. Results are discussed in terms of theories of intergroup threat and stigmatisation. Practical implications for predicting the success of de-institutionalisation and social integration of groups with special needs are addressed. Copyright (C) 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-49
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Community & Applied Social Psychology
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012

Keywords

  • intergroup contact
  • group size
  • severity
  • neighbouring
  • stigma
  • intellectual disability
  • not-in-my-backyard
  • INTERGROUP CONTACT
  • GROUP HOMES
  • COMMUNITY
  • ATTITUDES
  • ESTABLISHMENT
  • PERCEPTIONS
  • FACILITIES
  • MODEL

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