The impact of socioeconomic deprivation on mortality in cervical cancer patients in Cornwall (England)

H. Donkers*, J. McGrane, A. Eleuteri, P. Giamougiannis, R. Bekkers, K. Galaal

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives To assess the association between risk factors, including socioeconomic deprivation, and mortality, recurrence and chemo- or radiation toxicity in cervical cancer patients.Methods Retrospective study of cervical cancer patients diagnosed between January 2007 and July 2018. Patient characteristics and mortality data, including recurrence, were assessed, together with socioeconomic deprivation measures evaluated using the English Indices of Multiple Deprivation. Markov multi-state models were used to model mortality and recurrence, and logistic regression models were used to model chemo- or radiation toxicity.Results Included were 243 women with a median age of 49 years. A total of 57 patients died (23%), of which 41 due to cervical cancer, and 21 (9%) had recurrent disease. Hazard ratios (HR) showed no evidence of association between socioeconomic deprivation and cancer-specific hazard of mortality from diagnosis or recurrence, hazard of mortality due to other causes or hazard of cancer recurrence. Furthermore, there was no evidence of association between socioeconomic deprivation and chemo- or radiation toxicity (bowel, bladder or vaginal stenosis).Conclusions No associations were found between socioeconomic deprivation and cancer mortality or recurrence in cervical cancer patients in the population of Cornwall. In addition, no association was found between socioeconomic deprivation and chemo- or radiation toxicity.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13463
Number of pages10
JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
Volume30
Issue number5
Early online date24 May 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • cervical cancer
  • health inequalities
  • mortality
  • social deprivation
  • socioeconomic status
  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • MULTILEVEL ANALYSIS
  • PROSTATE-CANCER
  • SURVIVAL
  • WOMEN
  • SMOKING
  • RISK
  • COMPLICATIONS
  • INEQUALITIES
  • RACE/ETHNICITY

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