The Impact of Resident Postgraduate Year Involvement in Body-Contouring and Breast Reduction Procedures: A Comprehensive Analysis of 9638 Patients

Masoud Malyar, Abbas Peymani, Anna Rose Johnson, Austin D. Chen, Rene R. W. J. Van der Hulst, Samuel J. Lin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background Given the rising popularity in body-contouring procedures (BCPs) in the United States, it is important to assess the currently unknown association between resident involvement and postoperative complications. As such, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of resident involvement on outcomes in BCPs using a large national database. Methods A retrospective analysis of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was performed (2006-2012) to identify patients undergoing BCPs, using relevant Current Procedural Terminology codes. Outcome measures included postoperative complications, hospital length of stay, and operation time. Multivariate regression models were used to assess the impact of resident involvement and resident experience on outcomes. Results A total of 9638 cases were identified, of which 3311 involved resident participation. Resident involvement was associated with significantly higher rates of complications (7.8% vs 4.4%; P = 0.003) and longer operation times (180.7 vs 171.9 minutes; P = 0.005). For each year increase of resident postgraduate year, there was a significant decrease in odds of complications (odds ratio, 0.906; P = 0.013) and operative time (-2.7 minutes; P = 0.001). Conclusions Resident involvement in BCPs was associated with an increased rate of overall complications in a large, national database. However, the clinical significance of these outcomes may be debated. Increased postgraduate year experience as a surgical resident was inversely associated with overall complications. Guided resident autonomy and earlier exposure to BCPs could lead to an optimization of clinical outcomes and resident education.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)310-315
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • body contouring
  • resident involvement
  • patient outcomes
  • National Surgical Quality Improvement Program
  • QUALITY IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM
  • PLASTIC-SURGERY RESIDENCY
  • AMERICAN-COLLEGE
  • WOUND COMPLICATIONS
  • RISK-ASSESSMENT
  • MASS INDEX
  • OUTCOMES
  • PARTICIPATION
  • THROMBOEMBOLISM
  • RECONSTRUCTION

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