The impact of parental migration on psychological well-being of children in Ghana

R. Raturi, V. Cebotari*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study is the first to employ panel data to examine the time-varying effects of internal and international parental migration on the psychological well-being of children who stay behind in an African context. The analysis employs data collected in 2013, 2014 and 2015 from school going children aged 12-21 in two urban areas with high out-migration rates in Ghana - Kumasi and Sunyani. Using children's self-reports, an analysis was conducted separately for boys (N = 7 81) and girls (N = 7 05). Results indicate that girls and boys with the mother away internally or internationally are equally or more likely to have higher levels of psychological well-being when compared to boys and girls of non-migrant parents. A higher level of well-being is observed amongst girls when parents migrate and divorce. However, parental migration and divorce are more likely to increase the psychological vulnerability of boys. In Ghana, the psychological well-being of children is nuanced by which parent has migrated, marital status of migrant parent and the gender of the child.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 May 2022

Keywords

  • Parental migration
  • Psychological well-being
  • Transnational families
  • Children left-behind
  • Ghana
  • LEFT-BEHIND CHILDREN
  • MIGRANT PARENTS
  • TRANSNATIONAL MIGRATION
  • RURAL CHINA
  • FAMILY-LIFE
  • CHILDHOOD
  • GENDER
  • HEALTH
  • FACE

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