The immunity-diet-microbiota axis in the development of metabolic syndrome

E. Brandsma, Tom Houben, J. Fu, Ronit Shiri-Sverdlov, M. Hofker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Recent evidence demonstrates that the gut-microbiota can be considered as one of the major factors causing metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. RECENT FINDINGS: Pattern recognition receptors as well as antimicrobial peptides are a key factor in controlling the intestinal microbiota composition. Deficiencies in these genes lead to changes in the composition of the gut-microbiota, causing leakage of endotoxins into the circulation, and the development of low-grade chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. Dietary composition can also affect the microbiota: a diet rich in saturated fats allows the expansion of pathobionts that damage the intestinal epithelial cell layer and compromise its barrier function. In contrast, a diet high in fiber supports the microbiota to produce short-chain fatty acids, thereby promoting energy expenditure and protecting against inflammation and insulin resistance. SUMMARY: The interactions between the microbiota, innate immunity, and diet play an important role in controlling metabolic homeostasis. A properly functioning innate immune system, combined with a low-fat and high-fiber diet, is important in preventing dysbiosis and reducing the susceptibility to developing the metabolic syndrome and its associated cardiovascular diseases.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)73-81
Number of pages9
JournalCurrent Opinion in Lipidology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015

Keywords

  • endotoxemia
  • innate immunity
  • metabolic syndrome
  • microbiota
  • short-chain fatty acids
  • CHAIN FATTY-ACIDS
  • GUT MICROBIOTA
  • INTESTINAL MICROBIOTA
  • INSULIN SENSITIVITY
  • RECEPTOR
  • MICE
  • PROMOTES
  • MUCOSAL
  • DYSBIOSIS
  • OBESITY

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