The epidemiology of cancer in the United Arab Emirates: A systematic review

Hadia Radwan, Hayder Hasan, Rami A. Ballout, Rana Rizk*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Objective: We conducted a systematic review to explore the United Arab Emirates (UAE)'s cancer-specific epidemiological profiles. Methods: We followed the standardized methods for conducting and reporting systematic reviews. We employed a highly sensitive and extensive strategy to identify all studies on the prevalence and incidence of cancer in the UAE, searching electronic databases and the grey literature. We assessed the methodological quality of the studies, summarized them, and qualitatively analyzed their results. Results: We included 4 retrospective studies published between 2003 and 2011, reporting data gathered between 1982 and 2004. The majority of the data were collected from national cancer registries and addressed adult Emiratis and certain cancer types. All included studies employed validated procedures for diagnostic confirmation. The overall age-standardized cancer rates were 70.1 and 74.2 per 100,000 in males and females, respectively. Lung, gastric, and prostate cancer ranked as the top 3 types in Emirati males; while breast, cervical, and thyroid cancer were the top 3 types in Emirati females. Men exhibited higher rates of lung and stomach cancers compared with women. The majority of the studies were of acceptable methodological quality. Conclusions: Our findings highlight the need for high-quality future research and systematic cancer data collection and registration to provide reliable data on the current incidence of cancer. We hope that our findings guide the tailoring of interventions aimed at curbing cancer rates in the UAE.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere13618
Number of pages8
JournalMedicine
Volume97
Issue number50
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2018

Keywords

  • cancer
  • epidemiology
  • incidence rates
  • public health
  • systematic review
  • United Arab Emirates
  • NUTRITION TRANSITION
  • BREAST-CANCER
  • GLOBAL BURDEN
  • MIDDLE-EAST
  • ASSOCIATION
  • POPULATION
  • PREVALENCE
  • DIAGNOSIS
  • MORTALITY
  • PATTERNS

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