The effects of repeated denials and fabrication on memory

Fabiana Battista*, Ivan Mangiulli, Jan Herter, Antonietta Curci, Henry Otgaar

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Inthe current experiment, we were interested in the effects of lying (i.e. false denial or fabrication) on memory when deceptivestrategies were repeatedly executed. Participants (n = 121) watched a video (i.e., electrician who committed a burglary) and immediately afterand during the following ten days, they were instructed to either falsely deny, fabricate, or answer honestly to certain details of the video.Some details were discussed (i.e. denied, fabricated, or honestly answered) either once, or four times. Other details were never discussed.Finally, all participants received a memory test, in which they were asked whether they either previously discussed the details or saw thedetails during the video. Although, overall, repeated lying did not undermine memory for having discussed certain details, repeated falselydenying led to an impairment of the memory for the event. Findings show that lying can adversely affect memory and that repeated lying canincrease this effect
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)369-381
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cognitive Psychology
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 May 2020

Keywords

  • Repeated lying
  • false denials
  • fabrication
  • forgetting
  • denial-induced forgetting
  • FORCED CONFABULATION
  • SIMULATING AMNESIA
  • REPEATED EXPOSURE
  • FALSE DENIALS
  • CONSEQUENCES
  • WITNESSES
  • CREATION
  • MISINFORMATION
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • SUGGESTION

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