The effects of psychopathic traits on fear of pain, anxiety, and stress

Guillaume Durand*, Erika Matsumoto Plata

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

13 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The relationship between psychopathy and internalizing behaviours, such as fear of pain, anxiety, and stress, is highly debated due to conflicting results found across a wide array of studies. We hypothesized a negative relationship between higher display of Fearless Dominance and fear of pain, anxiety, and stress as well as a positive relationship between higher display of Impulsive Antisociality and the aforementioned variables. Using community participants (N = 529), we found weak to moderate negative correlations between Fearless Dominance and all measures of fear of pain, anxiety, and stress in both genders.

While a correlation between Impulsive Antisociality and pain catastrophization was only observed in males, weak to moderate positive relationships were found when correlated with measures of anxiety and stress in both genders. Overall, these results highlight the importance of taking psychopathy subtypes and genders into account when conducting statistical analyses for psychopathy-related research. The implications of these findings are discussed. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)198-203
Number of pages6
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume119
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Pain
  • Psychopathic traits
  • Fear of pain
  • Stress
  • Anxiety
  • CATASTROPHIZING SCALE
  • PERCEIVED STRESS
  • SELF-REPORT
  • PERSONALITY
  • SAMPLE
  • INVENTORY
  • INTELLIGENCE
  • STIMULATION
  • VALIDATION
  • TOLERANCE

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