Sustainable palm oil as a public responsibility? On the governance capacity of Indonesian standard for sustainable palm oil (ISPO)

Nia Hidayat, Astrid Offermans, Pieter Glasbergen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This paper is motivated by the observation that Southern governments start to take responsibility for a more sustainable production of agricultural commodities as a response to earlier private initiatives by businesses and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Indonesia is one of the leading countries in this respect, with new public sustainability regulations on coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Based on the concept of governance capacity, the paper develops an evaluation tool to answer the question whether the new public regulation on sustainable palm oil (ISPO) may become a viable alternative to private regulation. ISPO embraces a tremendous governance challenge as thousands of companies and millions of smallholder farmers are expected to participate. It is concluded that, although ISPO has initiated a process of change, it has not yet developed its full potential. The main reason regards ISPO’s rather loose problem definition, weak authority of the implementing organization, and the fact that the reliability of ISPO is still too low to convince (parts) of the global market. ISPO may therefore face difficulties in meeting its own targets and solving palm-oil related problems, such as deforestation, biodiversity loss, greenhouse gas emissions, and social conflicts between big plantations and local communities. The main governance challenge regards combining a more authoritative implementation mechanism with a convincing balance between sustainability objectives and economic interests of the sector.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-242
Number of pages20
JournalAgriculture and Human Values
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2018

Keywords

  • Governance capacity
  • Palm oil
  • ISPO
  • Public certification
  • Sustainability standards
  • VALUE CHAINS
  • ROUND-TABLE
  • DECENTRALIZATION
  • PLANTATIONS
  • PART

Cite this

@article{94736bddcd00485f8816e6813f1b91ff,
title = "Sustainable palm oil as a public responsibility?: On the governance capacity of Indonesian standard for sustainable palm oil (ISPO)",
abstract = "This paper is motivated by the observation that Southern governments start to take responsibility for a more sustainable production of agricultural commodities as a response to earlier private initiatives by businesses and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Indonesia is one of the leading countries in this respect, with new public sustainability regulations on coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Based on the concept of governance capacity, the paper develops an evaluation tool to answer the question whether the new public regulation on sustainable palm oil (ISPO) may become a viable alternative to private regulation. ISPO embraces a tremendous governance challenge as thousands of companies and millions of smallholder farmers are expected to participate. It is concluded that, although ISPO has initiated a process of change, it has not yet developed its full potential. The main reason regards ISPO’s rather loose problem definition, weak authority of the implementing organization, and the fact that the reliability of ISPO is still too low to convince (parts) of the global market. ISPO may therefore face difficulties in meeting its own targets and solving palm-oil related problems, such as deforestation, biodiversity loss, greenhouse gas emissions, and social conflicts between big plantations and local communities. The main governance challenge regards combining a more authoritative implementation mechanism with a convincing balance between sustainability objectives and economic interests of the sector.",
keywords = "Governance capacity, Palm oil, ISPO, Public certification, Sustainability standards, VALUE CHAINS, ROUND-TABLE, DECENTRALIZATION, PLANTATIONS, PART",
author = "Nia Hidayat and Astrid Offermans and Pieter Glasbergen",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1007/s10460-017-9816-6",
language = "English",
volume = "35",
pages = "223--242",
journal = "Agriculture and Human Values",
issn = "0889-048X",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

Sustainable palm oil as a public responsibility? On the governance capacity of Indonesian standard for sustainable palm oil (ISPO). / Hidayat, Nia; Offermans, Astrid; Glasbergen, Pieter.

In: Agriculture and Human Values, Vol. 35, No. 1, 03.2018, p. 223-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sustainable palm oil as a public responsibility?

T2 - On the governance capacity of Indonesian standard for sustainable palm oil (ISPO)

AU - Hidayat, Nia

AU - Offermans, Astrid

AU - Glasbergen, Pieter

PY - 2018/3

Y1 - 2018/3

N2 - This paper is motivated by the observation that Southern governments start to take responsibility for a more sustainable production of agricultural commodities as a response to earlier private initiatives by businesses and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Indonesia is one of the leading countries in this respect, with new public sustainability regulations on coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Based on the concept of governance capacity, the paper develops an evaluation tool to answer the question whether the new public regulation on sustainable palm oil (ISPO) may become a viable alternative to private regulation. ISPO embraces a tremendous governance challenge as thousands of companies and millions of smallholder farmers are expected to participate. It is concluded that, although ISPO has initiated a process of change, it has not yet developed its full potential. The main reason regards ISPO’s rather loose problem definition, weak authority of the implementing organization, and the fact that the reliability of ISPO is still too low to convince (parts) of the global market. ISPO may therefore face difficulties in meeting its own targets and solving palm-oil related problems, such as deforestation, biodiversity loss, greenhouse gas emissions, and social conflicts between big plantations and local communities. The main governance challenge regards combining a more authoritative implementation mechanism with a convincing balance between sustainability objectives and economic interests of the sector.

AB - This paper is motivated by the observation that Southern governments start to take responsibility for a more sustainable production of agricultural commodities as a response to earlier private initiatives by businesses and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). Indonesia is one of the leading countries in this respect, with new public sustainability regulations on coffee, cocoa and palm oil. Based on the concept of governance capacity, the paper develops an evaluation tool to answer the question whether the new public regulation on sustainable palm oil (ISPO) may become a viable alternative to private regulation. ISPO embraces a tremendous governance challenge as thousands of companies and millions of smallholder farmers are expected to participate. It is concluded that, although ISPO has initiated a process of change, it has not yet developed its full potential. The main reason regards ISPO’s rather loose problem definition, weak authority of the implementing organization, and the fact that the reliability of ISPO is still too low to convince (parts) of the global market. ISPO may therefore face difficulties in meeting its own targets and solving palm-oil related problems, such as deforestation, biodiversity loss, greenhouse gas emissions, and social conflicts between big plantations and local communities. The main governance challenge regards combining a more authoritative implementation mechanism with a convincing balance between sustainability objectives and economic interests of the sector.

KW - Governance capacity

KW - Palm oil

KW - ISPO

KW - Public certification

KW - Sustainability standards

KW - VALUE CHAINS

KW - ROUND-TABLE

KW - DECENTRALIZATION

KW - PLANTATIONS

KW - PART

U2 - 10.1007/s10460-017-9816-6

DO - 10.1007/s10460-017-9816-6

M3 - Article

VL - 35

SP - 223

EP - 242

JO - Agriculture and Human Values

JF - Agriculture and Human Values

SN - 0889-048X

IS - 1

ER -