Strong, but Wrong: Lay People's and Police Officers' Beliefs about Verbal and Nonverbal Cues to Deception

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

134 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The present study investigated the beliefs of students and police officers about cues to deception. A total of 95 police officers and 104 undergraduate students filled out a questionnaire addressing beliefs about cues to deception. Twenty-eight verbal cues were included in the questionnaire, all extracted from verbal credibility assessment tools (i.e., CBCA, RM, and SCAN). We investigated to what extent beliefs about nonverbal and verbal cues of deception differed between lay people (students) and police officers, and whether these beliefs were in agreement with objective cues known from research. Both students and police officers believed the usual stereotypical, but non-diagnostic (nonverbal) cues such as gaze aversion and increased movement to be indicative of deception. Yet, participants were less inclined to overestimate the relationship between verbal cues and deception and their beliefs fitted better with what we know from research. The implications of these findings for practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0156615
Number of pages19
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 Jun 2016

Keywords

  • CONFIRMATION BIAS
  • LIE DETECTION
  • ACCURACY
  • TRUTH
  • CBCA
  • SUSPECTS
  • ABILITY
  • CREDIBILITY
  • PREVALENCE
  • STATEMENTS

Cite this

@article{e5b550ea2c9945daae8b0bb1eca41d45,
title = "Strong, but Wrong: Lay People's and Police Officers' Beliefs about Verbal and Nonverbal Cues to Deception",
abstract = "The present study investigated the beliefs of students and police officers about cues to deception. A total of 95 police officers and 104 undergraduate students filled out a questionnaire addressing beliefs about cues to deception. Twenty-eight verbal cues were included in the questionnaire, all extracted from verbal credibility assessment tools (i.e., CBCA, RM, and SCAN). We investigated to what extent beliefs about nonverbal and verbal cues of deception differed between lay people (students) and police officers, and whether these beliefs were in agreement with objective cues known from research. Both students and police officers believed the usual stereotypical, but non-diagnostic (nonverbal) cues such as gaze aversion and increased movement to be indicative of deception. Yet, participants were less inclined to overestimate the relationship between verbal cues and deception and their beliefs fitted better with what we know from research. The implications of these findings for practice are discussed.",
keywords = "CONFIRMATION BIAS, LIE DETECTION, ACCURACY, TRUTH, CBCA, SUSPECTS, ABILITY, CREDIBILITY, PREVALENCE, STATEMENTS",
author = "Glynis Bogaard and Meijer, {Ewout H} and Aldert Vrij and Harald Merckelbach",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0156615",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "PLOS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "6",

}

Strong, but Wrong : Lay People's and Police Officers' Beliefs about Verbal and Nonverbal Cues to Deception. / Bogaard, Glynis; Meijer, Ewout H; Vrij, Aldert; Merckelbach, Harald.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 11, No. 6, e0156615, 03.06.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Strong, but Wrong

T2 - Lay People's and Police Officers' Beliefs about Verbal and Nonverbal Cues to Deception

AU - Bogaard, Glynis

AU - Meijer, Ewout H

AU - Vrij, Aldert

AU - Merckelbach, Harald

PY - 2016/6/3

Y1 - 2016/6/3

N2 - The present study investigated the beliefs of students and police officers about cues to deception. A total of 95 police officers and 104 undergraduate students filled out a questionnaire addressing beliefs about cues to deception. Twenty-eight verbal cues were included in the questionnaire, all extracted from verbal credibility assessment tools (i.e., CBCA, RM, and SCAN). We investigated to what extent beliefs about nonverbal and verbal cues of deception differed between lay people (students) and police officers, and whether these beliefs were in agreement with objective cues known from research. Both students and police officers believed the usual stereotypical, but non-diagnostic (nonverbal) cues such as gaze aversion and increased movement to be indicative of deception. Yet, participants were less inclined to overestimate the relationship between verbal cues and deception and their beliefs fitted better with what we know from research. The implications of these findings for practice are discussed.

AB - The present study investigated the beliefs of students and police officers about cues to deception. A total of 95 police officers and 104 undergraduate students filled out a questionnaire addressing beliefs about cues to deception. Twenty-eight verbal cues were included in the questionnaire, all extracted from verbal credibility assessment tools (i.e., CBCA, RM, and SCAN). We investigated to what extent beliefs about nonverbal and verbal cues of deception differed between lay people (students) and police officers, and whether these beliefs were in agreement with objective cues known from research. Both students and police officers believed the usual stereotypical, but non-diagnostic (nonverbal) cues such as gaze aversion and increased movement to be indicative of deception. Yet, participants were less inclined to overestimate the relationship between verbal cues and deception and their beliefs fitted better with what we know from research. The implications of these findings for practice are discussed.

KW - CONFIRMATION BIAS

KW - LIE DETECTION

KW - ACCURACY

KW - TRUTH

KW - CBCA

KW - SUSPECTS

KW - ABILITY

KW - CREDIBILITY

KW - PREVALENCE

KW - STATEMENTS

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0156615

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0156615

M3 - Article

C2 - 27258014

VL - 11

JO - PLOS ONE

JF - PLOS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 6

M1 - e0156615

ER -