Strength Training Affects Lower Extremity Gait Kinematics, Not Kinetics, in People With Diabetic Polyneuropathy

T. Melai, N.C. Schaper, T.H. Ijzerman, P.J.B. Willems, T.L.H. De Lange, K. Meijer, A.G. Lieverse, H.H.C.M. Savelberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Increased forefoot loading in diabetic polyneuropathy plays an important role in the development of plantar foot ulcers and can originate from alterations in muscle strength, joint moments and gait pattern. The current study evaluated whether strength training can improve lower extremity joint moments and spatiotemporal gait characteristics in patients with diabetic polyneuropathy. An intervention group receiving strength training during 24 weeks and a control group receiving no intervention. Measurements were performed in both groups at t= 0, t= 12, t= 24 and t= 52 weeks at an individually preferred and standardized imposed gait velocity. The strength training did not affect the maximal amplitude of hip, knee and ankle joint moments, but did result in an increase in stance phase duration, stride time and stride length of approximately 5 %, during the imposed gait velocity. In addition, both groups increased their preferred gait velocity over one year. Future longitudinal studies should further explore the possible effects of strength training on spatiotemporal gait characteristics. The current study provides valuable information on changes in gait velocities and the progressive lower extremity problems in patients with polyneuropathy.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-230
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Biomechanics
Volume30
Issue number2
Early online date13 Sep 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Keywords

  • physical therapy
  • gait
  • stride length
  • joint moments
  • plantar loading
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY
  • PLANTAR PRESSURE
  • FOOT ULCERATION
  • JOINT MOMENTS
  • TAI-CHI
  • NEUROPATHY
  • WALKING
  • MELLITUS
  • MOBILITY

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