Stem cells and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia - The five questions: Which cells, when, in which dose, to which patients via which route?

Martin Mueller*, Boris W. Kramer

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Preterm birth is the leading cause of death in newborns and children. Despite advances in perinatology, immature infants continue to face serious risks such chronic respiratory impairment from bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Current treatment options are insufficient and novel approaches are desperately needed. In recent years stem cells have emerged as potential candidates to treat BPD with mesenchymal stemistromal cells (MSCs) being particularly promising. MSCs originate from several stem cell niches including bone marrow, skin, or adipose, umbilical cord, and placental tissues. Although the first MSCs clinical trials in BPD are ongoing, multiple questions remain open. In this review, we discuss the question of the optimal cell source (live cells or cell products), route and timing of the transplantation. Furthermore, we discuss MSCs possible capacities including migration, homing, pro-angiogenesis, anti-inflammatory, and tissue-regenerative potential as well. (C) 2016 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)54-59
Number of pages6
JournalPaediatric Respiratory Reviews
Volume24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017

Keywords

  • Bronchopulmonary dysplasia
  • mesenchymal stem cell transplantation
  • paracrine immunomodulation
  • physiologic actions
  • outcomes
  • HUMAN UMBILICAL-CORD
  • INDUCED LUNG INJURY
  • MESENCHYMAL PROGENITOR CELLS
  • PRETERM BIRTH
  • STROMAL CELLS
  • HUMAN PLACENTA
  • LONG-TERM
  • THERAPY
  • MICE
  • DIFFERENTIATION

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