Steinberg and Durell (1968) revisited: increased rates of First Episode Psychosis following military induction in Greek Army Recruits

S. Dimitrakopoulos*, S. Vitoratou, T. Mougiakos, N. Bogeas, O. Giotakos, J. van Os, N. C. Stefanis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

2 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Since the seminal study of Steinbeck and Durell (1968), few epidemiological studies have attempted to replicate whether psychosocial stress precipitates the onset of a first psychotic episode. Our aim was to support or refute the finding of elevated psychosis incidence in the first month of army induction and to examine factors impacting the timing of onset. Data were collected from medical files of 186 army conscripts, hospitalized with a diagnosis of First Episode Psychosis (FEP) between 2005 and 2014 in the Psychiatric Military Hospital in Athens, Greece. FEP rates were at least 4.5 times higher in the first month of military service, compared with any other month. Earlier FEP onset was associated with rural environment at the time of birth, multiple drug use and service away from home. Psychosocial stress precipitates FEP, particularly in those exposed to other risk factors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)728-736
Number of pages9
JournalPsychological Medicine
Volume48
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • Psychosis
  • First episode psychosis
  • psychosocial stress
  • duration of untreated psychosis
  • STRESSFUL LIFE EVENTS
  • CLINICAL HIGH-RISK
  • PSYCHIATRIC MORBIDITY
  • EMOTIONAL REACTIVITY
  • FUTURE-DIRECTIONS
  • NEURAL DIATHESIS
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • ASSOCIATION
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • DISORDERS

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