SLC2A3 single-nucleotide polymorphism and duplication influence cognitive processing and population-specific risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

Soeren Merker, Andreas Reif, Georg C. Ziegler, Heike Weber, Ute Mayer, Ann-Christine Ehlis, Annette Conzelmann, Stefan Johansson, Clemens Mueller-Reible, Indrajit Nanda, Thomas Haaf, Reinhard Ullmann, Marcel Romanos, Andreas J. Fallgatter, Paul Pauli, Tatyana Strekalova, Charline Jansch, Alejandro Arias Vasquez, Jan Haavik, Marta RibasesJosep Antoni Ramos-Quiroga, Jan K. Buitelaar, Barbara Franke, Klaus-Peter Lesch*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)798-809
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Volume58
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
  • glucose transporter
  • SLC2A3
  • single-nucleotide polymorphisms
  • duplication
  • copy number variants
  • energy homeostasis
  • frontostriatal network
  • DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
  • GLUCOSE-TRANSPORTER EXPRESSION
  • GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
  • NEUROTRANSMITTER HOMEOSTASIS
  • SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE
  • WORKING-MEMORY
  • RARE VARIANTS
  • IGF-I
  • BRAIN
  • BEHAVIOR

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