SHOULD PATIENT SETUP IN LUNG CANCER BE BASED ON THE PRIMARY TUMOR? AN ANALYSIS OF TUMOR COVERAGE AND NORMAL TISSUE DOSE USING REPEATED POSITRON EMISSION TOMOGRAPHY/COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IMAGING

Wouter van Elmpt*, Michel Ollers, Philippe Lambin, Dirk De Ruysscher

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Purpose: Evaluation of the dose distribution for lung cancer patients using a patient setup procedure based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. Methods and materials: For 39 patients with non small-cell lung cancer, the planning fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) scan was registered to a repeated FDG-PET/CT scan made in the second week of treatment. Two patient setup methods were analyzed based on the bony anatomy or the primary tumor. The original treatment plan was copied to the repeated scan, and target and normal tissue structures were delineated. Dose distributions we:re analyzed using dose volume histograms for the primary tumor, lymph nodes, lungs, and spinal cord. Results: One patient showed decreased dose coverage of the primary tumor caused by progressive disease and required replanning to achieve adequate coverage. For the other patients, the minimum dose to the primary tumor did not significantly deviate from the planned dose: -0.2 +/- 1.7% (p = 0.71) and -0.1 +/- 1.7% (p = 0.85) for the bony anatomy setup and the primary tumor setup, respectively. For patients (n = 31) with nodal involvement, 10% showed a decrease in minimum dose larger than 5% for the bony anatomy setup and 13% for the primary tumor setup. The mean lung dose exceeded the maximum allowed 20 Gy in 21% of the patients for the bony anatomy setup and In 13% for the primary tumor setup, Whereas for the spinal cord this occurred in 10% and 13% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: In 10% and 13% of patients with nodal, involvement, setup based on bony anatomy or primary tumor, respectively, led to important dose deviations in nodal target volumes. Overdosage of critical structures occurred in 10-20% of the patients. In cases of progressive disease, repeated imaging revealed underdosage of the primary tumor. Development of practical ways for setup procedures based on repeated high-quality imaging of all tumor sites during radiotherapy should therefore be an important research focus.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)379-385
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

Keywords

  • Patient setup
  • Lung cancer
  • Mediastinal lymph nodes
  • Adaptive radiotherapy
  • Dose distribution
  • Repeated imaging

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