Retrograde colonic irrigation for faecal incontinence after low anterior resection.

S.M. Koch, M.P. Rietveld, B. Govaert, W.G. van Gemert, C.G. Baeten

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    Abstract

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: This study aims to evaluate the therapeutic effect of retrograde colonic irrigation in patients with faecal incontinence after a low anterior resection for a rectal carcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with a previous low anterior resection, who were selected for treatment with retrograde colonic irrigation for faecal incontinence between 2005 and 2008, were included in the study. The data from the patients were gathered by chart research and an interview by phone. RESULTS: Thirty patients were included in the study. Three patients died and one patient was not able to answer questions due to a cognitive disorder. The data of the remaining 26 patients were analysed. Five patients had already stopped with the retrograde colonic irrigation treatment due to side effects. Twelve of the 21 patients (57.46%) who still performed RCI became completely (pseudo)continent, three patients (14.2%) were incontinent for flatus and six patients (29.4%) were still incontinent for liquid stool. Five patients stopped with the retrograde colonic irrigation treatment due to side-effects. CONCLUSION: Retrograde colonic irrigation is an effective method to treat patients with faecal incontinence after a low anterior resection for rectal carcinoma. Retrograde colonic irrigation is not invasive and has only mild side effects.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1019-1022
    JournalInternational Journal of Colorectal Disease
    Volume24
    Issue number9
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2009

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