Retrieval-Induced Forgetting in the Feigning Amnesia for a Crime Paradigm

Ivan Mangiulli*, Kim van Oorsouw, Antonietta Curci, Marko Jelicic

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Previous studies demonstrated that, when asked to honestly provide information about a mock crime, former feigners performed worse than those who were requested to confess to this event. Thus, feigning amnesia for a mock crime undermined genuine memory for the same experience. In the present study, we examined whether retrieval induced forgetting (RIF) underlies this memory-undermining effect. After watching a mock crime, participants had to feign amnesia or confess to having committed that crime. Feigners were given retrieval practice instructions (i.e., retrieval-practice group) or no further instructions (i.e., control group). Immediately and 1 day later, all participants had to genuinely report what they remembered about the crime. Although simulators in the retrieval-practice group recalled the largest amount of information as a positive consequence of retrieval, the ratio for crucial crime-related details was lower than that exhibited by both simulators who were given no instructions and confessors. These findings suggest that RIF might play a role in forgetting critical information in claims of crime-related amnesia. Theoretical and practical implications will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number928
Number of pages10
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • feigning amnesia
  • retrieval-induced forgetting
  • inhibition
  • malingering
  • memory errors
  • SIMULATING AMNESIA
  • EYEWITNESS-MEMORY
  • INHIBITION
  • INTERFERENCE
  • INFORMATION
  • CONSEQUENCE
  • RECALL
  • POWER

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