Religious Involvement, Religious Context, and Self-Assessed Health in Europe

Tim Huijts*, Gerbert Kraaykamp

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

33 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

In the present study, the authors examine the extent to which effects of individual religious involvement on self-assessed health are influenced by the religious context (i.e., religious involvement at the country level). The authors test their expectations using individual level data (N = 127,257) on 28 countries from the European Social Surveys (2002-2008). Results of multilevel analyses show that individual religious attendance is positively related to self-assessed health in Europe. Protestants appear to feel healthier than Catholics. Moreover, modeling cross-level interactions demonstrates that religious denominations at the national level are influential: The health advantage of Protestants as compared to Catholics is greater as the percentage of Protestants in a country is higher, yet smaller as countries have a higher percentage of Catholics. The association between religious attendance and self-assessed health does not depend on the national level of religious attendance.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-106
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Health and Social Behavior
Volume52
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • cross-national research
  • Europe
  • health
  • multilevel models
  • religious involvement
  • SOCIAL SUPPORT
  • MENTAL-HEALTH
  • MORTALITY
  • COMMUNITY
  • DELINQUENCY
  • ATTENDANCE
  • ATTITUDES
  • SERVICES
  • ALCOHOL
  • CANCER

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