Relationships between type of pain and work participation in people with long-standing spinal cord injury: results from a cross-sectional study

Ellen H. Roels*, Michiel F. Reneman, Janneke Stolwijk-Swuste, Charlotte C. van Laake-Geelen, Sonja de Groot, Jacinthe J. E. Adriaansen, Marcel W. M. Post

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Study design Multicentre, cross-sectional study.

Objectives To describe the relationships between the presence of (different types of) pain and participation in paid work in people with long-standing spinal cord injury (SCI). Furthermore, the associations of pain-related work limitations, age, gender, relationship, education, lesion level, and time since injury (TSI) with work participation (WP) were investigated.

Setting The Netherlands.

Methods Individuals (n = 265) with SCI for >= 10 years were included. Data were collected through a structured consultation with a rehabilitation physician and self-report questionnaire Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were performed.

Results Median age of participants was 47.9 years, median time since injury was 22 years, 73% were male, 69% had complete SCI and 59% had paraplegia, 50% had paid work, 63% reported musculoskeletal pain, 49% reported neuropathic pain, and 31% reported other pain. Self-reported pain-related work limitations were significantly (V = 0.26 and V = 0.27) related to WP. In bivariable logistic regression analyses, no statistically significant relationships between type of pain and WP were observed. Younger age (OR=0.96), male gender (OR=0.52), a stable relationship (OR = 1.70), and shorter time since SCI (OR = 0.97) were significantly associated with a higher chance of being employed. Multivariable analysis confirmed these findings and in addition showed a higher level of education to be positively related with WP.

Conclusion Age, gender, relationship, education, TSI and self-reported work limitations showed a relationship with WP. Different types of pain were unrelated to WP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-460
Number of pages8
JournalSpinal Cord
Volume56
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2018

Keywords

  • SECONDARY HEALTH CONDITIONS
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • EMPLOYMENT STATUS
  • PSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS
  • CHRONOLOGICAL AGE
  • UNITED-STATES
  • INDIVIDUALS
  • ADJUSTMENT
  • RETURN
  • ASSOCIATION

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