Reduced fetal growth velocities and the association with neonatal outcomes in appropriate-for-gestational-age neonates: a retrospective cohort study

M. L. E. Hendrix*, S. M. J. van Kuijk, A. W. D. Gavilanes, D. Kramer, M. E. A. Spaanderman, S. Al Nasiry

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BackgroundFetal growth restriction is, despite advances in neonatal care and uptake of antenatal ultrasound scanning, still a major cause of perinatal morbidity. Neonates with birth weight>10th percentile are assumed to be appropriate-for-gestational-age (AGA), although many are at increased risk of perinatal morbidity, because of undetected mild restriction of growth potential. We hypothesized that within AGA neonates, reduced fetal growth velocities are associated with adverse neonatal outcome.MethodsA retrospective cohort study of singleton pregnancies, in the Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC) between 2010 and 2016. Women had two fetal biometry scans (18-22weeks and 30-34weeks of gestational age) and delivered a newborn with a birth weight between the 10th-80th percentile.Differences in growth velocities of the abdominal circumference (AC), biparietal diameter (BPD), head circumference (HC) and femur length (FL) were compared between the suboptimal AGA (sAGA) (birth weight centiles 10-50) and optimal AGA (oAGA) (birth weight centiles 50-80) group. We assessed the association between velocities and neonatal outcomes.ResultsWe included 934 singleton pregnancies. In the suboptimal AGA group, fetal growth velocities were lower (in mm/week): AC 10.721.00 vs 11.23 +/- 1.00 (p

Original languageEnglish
Article number31
Number of pages10
JournalBMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
Volume19
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Fetal growth restriction
  • Abdominal circumference velocity
  • Neonatal outcome
  • Ultrasound
  • Appropriate-for-gestational-age neonates
  • PREDICTION
  • RESTRICTION
  • DOPPLER
  • WEIGHT
  • PERFORMANCE
  • GUIDELINES
  • MANAGEMENT
  • TRIMESTER
  • FAILURE
  • MARKER

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