RAGE deficiency does not affect non-alcoholic steatohepatitis and atherosclerosis in Western type diet-fed Ldlr(-/-) mice

Mitchell Bijnen, Nicky Beelen, Suzan Wetzels, Jose van De Gaar, Maria Vroomen, Erwin Wijnands, Jean L. Scheijen, Marjo P. H. van de Waarenburg, Marion J. Gijbels, Jack P. Cleutjens, Erik A. L. Biessen, Coen D. A. Stehouwer, Casper G. Schalkwijk, Kristiaan Wouters*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

12 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a spectrum of liver diseases ranging from steatosis only to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The latter is characterized by hepatic inflammation, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. It is poorly understood which factors contribute to the onset of hepatic inflammation characterizing the progression from steatosis to NASH. Previously, we demonstrated increased advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) in the livers of NASH patients. We hypothesise that AGEs play a key role in NASH development by activating their proinflammatory receptor, RAGE. RAGE-deficient mice and wildtype littermates, both on Ldlr(-/-) background, were fed a Western type diet (WTD) for 3 or 12 weeks. Flow cytometry, histology, gene expression and AGE measurements were performed to evaluate the effects of RAGE deficiency. RAGE-deficient mice displayed reduced weight gain and visceral fat expansion compared to control mice. No difference in adipose tissue inflammation was observed between groups. RAGE deficiency did not affect WTD-induced monocytosis, circulating lipids or hepatic steatosis. WTD-induced hepatic neutrophil and macrophage accumulation and atherosclerotic plaque development was comparable between control and RAGE-deficient mice. No difference in AGE levels was observed. RAGE does not seem to play a major role in the development of NASH or atherosclerosis in a hyperlipidemic mouse model.

Original languageEnglish
Article number15256
Number of pages11
JournalScientific Reports
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • GLYCATION END-PRODUCTS
  • FATTY LIVER-DISEASE
  • NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA
  • HEPATIC INFLAMMATION
  • REPERFUSION INJURY
  • OXIDIZED LDL
  • FOLLOW-UP
  • RECEPTOR
  • OBESITY
  • CHOLESTEROL

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