Psychometric Validation of the Autism Impact Measure (AIM)

Richard Houghton, Brigitta Monz, Kiely Law, Georg Loss, Stephanie Le Scouiller, Frank de Vries, Tom Willgoss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The Autism impact measure (AIM) is a caregiver-reported questionnaire assessing autism symptom frequency and impact in children, previously shown to have good test-retest reliability, convergent validity and structural validity. This study extended previous work by exploring the AIM's ability to discriminate between 'known-groups' of children, and estimating thresholds for clinically important responses. Data were collected online and electronically on computer and mobile devices; hence, it was also possible to confirm other psychometric properties of the AIM in this format. This study provides confirmatory and additional psychometric validation of the AIM. The AIM offers a valid, quick and inexpensive method for caregivers to report core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) including communication deficits, difficulties with social interactions and repetitive behaviors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2559-2570
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
Volume49
Issue number6
Early online date9 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2019

Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • LIFE
  • Outcome
  • Psychometric validation
  • Symptoms
  • Treatment

Cite this

Houghton, Richard ; Monz, Brigitta ; Law, Kiely ; Loss, Georg ; Le Scouiller, Stephanie ; de Vries, Frank ; Willgoss, Tom. / Psychometric Validation of the Autism Impact Measure (AIM). In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 49, No. 6. pp. 2559-2570.
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Psychometric Validation of the Autism Impact Measure (AIM). / Houghton, Richard; Monz, Brigitta; Law, Kiely; Loss, Georg; Le Scouiller, Stephanie; de Vries, Frank; Willgoss, Tom.

In: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, Vol. 49, No. 6, 06.2019, p. 2559-2570.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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