Prevalence of chronic kidney disease after preeclampsia

Veronica Agatha Lopes van Balen*, Julia Jeltje Spaan, Tom Cornelis, Marc Erich August Spaanderman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

20 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background Preeclampsia (PE), an endothelial disease that affects kidney function during pregnancy, is correlated to an increased future risk of cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease. The Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) 2012 guideline emphasizes the combined role of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and albuminuria in determining the frequency of monitoring of kidney function.

Objectives In this study we evaluated the prevalence of CKD in women with a history of PE. We investigated how many seemingly healthy women required monitoring of kidney function according to the KDIGO guideline.

Methods We included 775 primiparous women with a history of PE. They were at least 4 months postpartum, and had no pre-existing hypertension, diabetes or kidney disease. We estimated GFR by the CKD-Epidemiology equation and urinary albumin loss by albumin creatinine ratio in a 24-h urine collection.

Results Most women, 669 (86.3 %), had a normal GFR and absent albuminuria. Based on the KDIGO guideline, 13.7 % would require at least yearly monitoring of kidney function. Only 1.4 % were classified to be at high risk for kidney function deterioration.

Conclusion Monitoring of kidney function seems relevant for about one in seven women with a history of PE, mainly due to albuminuria. Albuminuria should be evaluated postpartum to identify those women that need further monitoring of kidney function.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-409
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nephrology
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Kidney function
  • Preeclampsia
  • Postpartum
  • KDIGO criteria
  • LOW-GRADE ALBUMINURIA
  • STAGE RENAL-DISEASE
  • CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE
  • BLOOD-PRESSURE
  • RISK
  • PREGNANCY
  • WOMEN
  • MICROALBUMINURIA
  • METAANALYSIS
  • HYPERTENSION

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