Pretreatment of Rapeseed Meal Increases Its Recalcitrant Fiber Fermentation and Alters the Microbial Community in an in vitro Model of Swine Large Intestine

Cheng Long, Koen Venema*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The aim of current study was to investigate in an in vitro study how enzymatic and chemical pretreated rapeseed meal (RSM) influences the fiber fermentation and microbial community in the swine large intestine. RSM was processed enzymatically by a cellulase (CELL), two pectinases (PECT), or chemically by an alkaline (ALK) treatment. 16S rRNA gene sequencing data was performed to evaluate changes in the gut microbiota composition, whereas short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) production (ion-chromatography) and non-starch polysaccharides (NSP) composition (using monoclonal antibodies; mAbs) were used to assess fiber degradation. The results showed that ALK, CELL, PECT1, and PECT2 changed microbial community composition, increased the predicted abundance of microbial fiber-degrading enzymes and pathways, and increased acetic acid, propionic acid, butyric acid, and total SCFA production. The increased microbial genera positively correlated with SCFA production. Monoclonal antibody analyses showed that the cell wall polysaccharide structures of RSM shifted after ALK, CELL, PECT1, and PECT2 treatment. The degradation of NSP during the fermentation period was dynamic, and not continuous based on the epitope recognition by mAbs. This study provides the first detailed analysis of changes in the swine intestinal microbiota due to RSM modified by ALK, CELL, PECT1, and PECT2, which altered the microbial community structure, shifted the predicted functional metagenomic profile and subsequently increased total SCFA production. Our findings that ALK, CELL, PECT1, and PECT2 increased fiber degradability in RSM could help guide feed additive strategies to improve efficiency and productivity in swine industry. The current study gave insight into how enzymatic treatment of feed can alter microbial communities, which provides good opportunity to develop novel carbohydrase treatments, particularly in swine feed.

Original languageEnglish
Article number588264
Pages (from-to)588264
Number of pages15
JournalFrontiers in microbiology
Volume11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2020

Keywords

  • cell wall polysaccharides
  • rapeseed meal
  • pig gut microbiota
  • pectinase
  • cellulase
  • CELL-WALLS
  • NONSTARCH POLYSACCHARIDES
  • PROCESSING TECHNOLOGIES
  • FIBROLYTIC ENZYMES
  • DEGRADING ENZYMES
  • PECTIC SUBSTANCES
  • RUMEN
  • BACTERIA
  • IMPACT
  • DIET

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