Preliminary evidence that endoscopic gastroplication reduces food reward

Givan F. Paulus*, Mark van Avesaat, Jasper A. W. Crijnen, L. W. Ernest van Heurn, Margriet S. Westerterp-Plantenga, Nicole D. Bouvy

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Web of Science)

Abstract

Morbidly obese patients are most successfully treated with bariatric surgery. Although restrictive gastric surgery physically limits food intake, it is also suggested that eating behavior and food-reward mechanisms are affected. Therefore, eating behavior and food-reward were assessed in ten patients that underwent gastric volume reduction by endoscopic gastroplication. Patients participated in test days before and one, three and twelve months after the procedure. Weight loss, food intake, appetite, gastric emptying rate, food-reward (i.e. liking and wanting) and eating behavior were assessed. Body mass index decreased from 38.3 (37.6-42.6) to 33.9 (31.0-35.9) kg/m(2) after one year. Ad libitum food intake decreased significantly after one month, but not after one year. Gastric emptying rate did not change. AUC of VAS scores for desire to eat, quantity, fullness, hunger, snacking and satiety changed after one month, but not all remained significantly changed after one year. Thirst did not change. Liking scores of food items decreased significantly in the fasted as well as the satiated state after the procedure. Wanting scores did not change. Uncontrolled eating decreased significantly after three and twelve months; emotional eating was only significantly decreased after three months. The results show that food intake decreases, while VAS scores for appetite and eating behavior change accordingly. Liking, but not wanting of food items changed to benefit the weight losing patient. The effects were stronger at one-month follow-up than at 12 months, which may be a risk of relapse after initial successful weight loss. The effects of new bariatric procedures on food-reward should be studied in future randomized trials to further elucidate their impact.

Original languageEnglish
Article number104632
Number of pages7
JournalAppetite
Volume150
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2020

Keywords

  • Morbid obesity
  • Endoscopic gastroplication
  • Bariatric surgery
  • Food-reward
  • Food behavior
  • Linking and wanting
  • Y GASTRIC BYPASS
  • SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY
  • WEIGHT-LOSS
  • OBESITY
  • BRAIN
  • ACTIVATION
  • GHRELIN
  • SURGERY
  • ABSENCE
  • STRESS

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