Predictors of health-related quality of life and participation after brain injury rehabilitation: The role of neuropsychological factors

H Boosman, I Winkens, C M van Heugten, S M C Rasquin, V.A. Heijnen, J M A Visser-Meily

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The aims of this longitudinal study were: (1) to assess associations between neuropsychological factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and participation three months after discharge from inpatient acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation; and (2) to determine the best neuropsychological predictor of HRQoL and participation after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. Patients with ABI (n=100) were assessed within approximately two weeks of enrolment in inpatient rehabilitation. Predictor variables included demographic and injury-related characteristics and the following neuropsychological factors: active and passive coping, attention, executive functioning, verbal memory, learning potential, depressive symptoms, motivation, extraversion, neuroticism and self-awareness. Bivariate analyses revealed that passive coping, executive functioning, depressive symptoms, extraversion, and neuroticism were significantly associated with HRQoL and/or participation. Neuropsychological factors significantly explained additional variance in HRQoL (18.1-21.6%) and participation (6.9-20.3%) after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. However, a higher tendency towards passive coping was the only significant neuropsychological predictor (=-0.305 to -0.464) of lower HRQoL and participation. This study shows that neuropsychological functioning, and in particular passive coping, plays a role in predicting HRQoL and participation after inpatient ABI rehabilitation and emphasises the importance of addressing patients' coping styles in an early phase of ABI rehabilitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)581-598
Number of pages18
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • Adult
  • Stroke
  • Prognosis
  • Treatment outcome
  • Neuropsychology
  • IMPAIRED SELF-AWARENESS
  • EAST MELBOURNE STROKE
  • DEPRESSION SCALE
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • SATISFACTION
  • VALIDITY
  • QUESTIONNAIRE
  • INSTRUMENTS
  • MOTIVATION
  • SYMPTOMS

Cite this

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title = "Predictors of health-related quality of life and participation after brain injury rehabilitation: The role of neuropsychological factors",
abstract = "The aims of this longitudinal study were: (1) to assess associations between neuropsychological factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and participation three months after discharge from inpatient acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation; and (2) to determine the best neuropsychological predictor of HRQoL and participation after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. Patients with ABI (n=100) were assessed within approximately two weeks of enrolment in inpatient rehabilitation. Predictor variables included demographic and injury-related characteristics and the following neuropsychological factors: active and passive coping, attention, executive functioning, verbal memory, learning potential, depressive symptoms, motivation, extraversion, neuroticism and self-awareness. Bivariate analyses revealed that passive coping, executive functioning, depressive symptoms, extraversion, and neuroticism were significantly associated with HRQoL and/or participation. Neuropsychological factors significantly explained additional variance in HRQoL (18.1-21.6{\%}) and participation (6.9-20.3{\%}) after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. However, a higher tendency towards passive coping was the only significant neuropsychological predictor (=-0.305 to -0.464) of lower HRQoL and participation. This study shows that neuropsychological functioning, and in particular passive coping, plays a role in predicting HRQoL and participation after inpatient ABI rehabilitation and emphasises the importance of addressing patients' coping styles in an early phase of ABI rehabilitation.",
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author = "H Boosman and I Winkens and {van Heugten}, {C M} and Rasquin, {S M C} and V.A. Heijnen and Visser-Meily, {J M A}",
year = "2017",
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Predictors of health-related quality of life and participation after brain injury rehabilitation : The role of neuropsychological factors. / Boosman, H; Winkens, I; van Heugten, C M; Rasquin, S M C; Heijnen, V.A.; Visser-Meily, J M A.

In: Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, Vol. 27, No. 4, 2017, p. 581-598.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predictors of health-related quality of life and participation after brain injury rehabilitation

T2 - The role of neuropsychological factors

AU - Boosman, H

AU - Winkens, I

AU - van Heugten, C M

AU - Rasquin, S M C

AU - Heijnen, V.A.

AU - Visser-Meily, J M A

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - The aims of this longitudinal study were: (1) to assess associations between neuropsychological factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and participation three months after discharge from inpatient acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation; and (2) to determine the best neuropsychological predictor of HRQoL and participation after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. Patients with ABI (n=100) were assessed within approximately two weeks of enrolment in inpatient rehabilitation. Predictor variables included demographic and injury-related characteristics and the following neuropsychological factors: active and passive coping, attention, executive functioning, verbal memory, learning potential, depressive symptoms, motivation, extraversion, neuroticism and self-awareness. Bivariate analyses revealed that passive coping, executive functioning, depressive symptoms, extraversion, and neuroticism were significantly associated with HRQoL and/or participation. Neuropsychological factors significantly explained additional variance in HRQoL (18.1-21.6%) and participation (6.9-20.3%) after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. However, a higher tendency towards passive coping was the only significant neuropsychological predictor (=-0.305 to -0.464) of lower HRQoL and participation. This study shows that neuropsychological functioning, and in particular passive coping, plays a role in predicting HRQoL and participation after inpatient ABI rehabilitation and emphasises the importance of addressing patients' coping styles in an early phase of ABI rehabilitation.

AB - The aims of this longitudinal study were: (1) to assess associations between neuropsychological factors and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and participation three months after discharge from inpatient acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation; and (2) to determine the best neuropsychological predictor of HRQoL and participation after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. Patients with ABI (n=100) were assessed within approximately two weeks of enrolment in inpatient rehabilitation. Predictor variables included demographic and injury-related characteristics and the following neuropsychological factors: active and passive coping, attention, executive functioning, verbal memory, learning potential, depressive symptoms, motivation, extraversion, neuroticism and self-awareness. Bivariate analyses revealed that passive coping, executive functioning, depressive symptoms, extraversion, and neuroticism were significantly associated with HRQoL and/or participation. Neuropsychological factors significantly explained additional variance in HRQoL (18.1-21.6%) and participation (6.9-20.3%) after controlling for demographic and injury-related factors. However, a higher tendency towards passive coping was the only significant neuropsychological predictor (=-0.305 to -0.464) of lower HRQoL and participation. This study shows that neuropsychological functioning, and in particular passive coping, plays a role in predicting HRQoL and participation after inpatient ABI rehabilitation and emphasises the importance of addressing patients' coping styles in an early phase of ABI rehabilitation.

KW - Adult

KW - Stroke

KW - Prognosis

KW - Treatment outcome

KW - Neuropsychology

KW - IMPAIRED SELF-AWARENESS

KW - EAST MELBOURNE STROKE

KW - DEPRESSION SCALE

KW - HOSPITAL ANXIETY

KW - SATISFACTION

KW - VALIDITY

KW - QUESTIONNAIRE

KW - INSTRUMENTS

KW - MOTIVATION

KW - SYMPTOMS

U2 - 10.1080/09602011.2015.1113996

DO - 10.1080/09602011.2015.1113996

M3 - Article

C2 - 26609798

VL - 27

SP - 581

EP - 598

JO - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

JF - Neuropsychological Rehabilitation

SN - 0960-2011

IS - 4

ER -