Prediction of Objectively Measured Physical Activity and Self-Reported Disability Following Lumbar Fusion Surgery

Max Jakobsson*, Helena Brisby, Annelie Gutke, Olle Hagg, Hanna Lotzke, Rob Smeets, Mari Lundberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

11 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the predictive value of preoperative fear-avoidance factors (self-efficacy for exercise, pain catastrophizing, kinesiophobia, and depression), walking capacity, and traditional predictor variables for predicting postoperative changes in physical activity level and disability 6 months after lumbar fusion surgery in patients with chronic low back pain (LBP).

METHODS: We prospectively enrolled 118 patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery for motion-elicited chronic LBP with degenerative changes in 1-3 segments of the lumbar spine. Associations between the predictors and the dependent variables were investigated with multiple linear regression analysis. Dependent variables were physical activity level as objectively measured with a triaxial accelerometer and disability as measured with the Oswestry Disability Index.

RESULTS: Preoperative physical activity level (beta = -0.349; P

CONCLUSIONS: Patients with low levels of preoperative physical activity were more likely to increase their level of physical activity after lumbar fusion surgery, especially when their self-efficacy for exercise was high. However, most of these patients still had low levels of physical activity after surgery, and they may therefore need extra support in increasing their postoperative physical activity levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)E77-E88
Number of pages12
JournalWorld Neurosurgery
Volume121
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Disability
  • Lumbar fusion surgery
  • Pain catastrophizing
  • Physical activity
  • Predictors
  • Prognosis
  • Self-efficacy
  • LOW-BACK-PAIN
  • PSYCHOLOGICAL PREDICTORS
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • SPINAL STENOSIS
  • RISK-FACTOR
  • RELIABILITY
  • MANAGEMENT
  • INTENSITY
  • EFFICACY
  • VALIDITY

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