Predicting the Duration of Emotional Experience: Two Experience Sampling Studies

Philippe Verduyn*, Ellen Delvaux, Hermina Van Coillie, Francis Tuerlinckx, Iven Van Mechelen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The authors present 2 studies to explain the variability in the duration of emotional experience. Participants were asked to report the duration of their fear, anger, joy, gratitude, and sadness episodes on a daily basis. Information was further collected with regard to potential predictor variables at 3 levels: trait predictors, episode predictors, and moment predictors. Discrete-time survival analyses revealed that, for all 5 emotions under study, the higher the importance of the emotion-eliciting situation and the higher the intensity of the emotion at onset, the longer the emotional experience lasts. Moreover, a reappearance, either physically or merely mentally, of the eliciting stimulus during the emotional episode extended the duration of the emotional experience as well. These findings display interesting links with predictions within N. H. Frijda's theory of emotion, with the phenomenon of reinstatement (as studied within the domain of learning psychology), and with the literature on rumination
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-91
Number of pages9
JournalEmotion
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • emotional experience
  • duration
  • predictors
  • discrete-time survival analysis
  • NONMARITAL RELATIONSHIP DISSOLUTION
  • INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES
  • CORE AFFECT
  • REINSTATEMENT
  • VARIABILITY
  • LIFE
  • VALENCE

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