Point-of-care testing in primary care patients with acute cardiopulmonary symptoms: a systematic review

Angel M. R. Schols*, Jacqueline P. G. Stakenborg, Geert-Jan Dinant, Robert T. A. Willemsen, Jochen W. L. Cals

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background. Point-of-care tests (POCT) can assist general practitioners (GPs) in diagnosing and treating patients with acute cardiopulmonary symptoms, but it is currently unknown if POCT impact relevant clinical outcomes in these patients. Objective. To assess whether using POCT in primary care patients with acute cardiopulmonary symptoms leads to more accurate diagnosis and impacts clinical management. Methods. We performed a systematic review in four bibliographic databases. Articles published before February 2016 were screened by two reviewers. Studies evaluating the effect of GP use of POCT on clinical diagnostic accuracy and/or effect on treatment and referral rate in patients with cardiopulmonary symptoms were included. Results. Our search yielded nine papers describing data from seven studies, on the clinical diagnostic accuracy of POCT in a total of 2277 primary care patients with acute cardiopulmonary symptoms. Four papers showed data on GP use of D-dimer POCT in pulmonary embolism (two studies); two studies on Troponin T in acute coronary syndrome; one on heart-type fatty acid-binding protein (H-FABP) in acute coronary syndrome; one on B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in heart failure; one on 3-in-1 POCT (Troponin T, BNP, D-dimer) in acute coronary syndrome, heart failure and/or pulmonary embolism. Only one study assessed the effect of GP use of POCT on treatment initiation and one on actual referral rates. Conclusion. There is currently limited and inconclusive evidence that actual GP use of POCT in primary care patients with acute cardiopulmonary symptoms leads to more accurate diagnosis and affects clinical management. However, some studies show promising results, especially when a POCT is combined with a clinical decision rule.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-12
Number of pages9
JournalFamily Practice
Volume35
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2018

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • general practice
  • heart
  • lung
  • point-of-care testing
  • primary health care
  • C-REACTIVE PROTEIN
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • ACID-BINDING PROTEIN
  • RESPIRATORY-TRACT INFECTIONS
  • ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION
  • CLINICAL-PREDICTION RULE
  • ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROME
  • OPTIMAL CUTOFF POINT
  • PULMONARY-EMBOLISM
  • D-DIMER

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