Pharmacotherapy for Nocturia

Karl-Erik Andersson*, Philip Van Kerrebroeck

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

15 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Purpose of Review To assess current pharmacological principles used for treatment of nocturia/nocturnal polyuria. Recent Findings The pathophysiology of nocturia is often multifactorial, but two main mechanisms have been identified, occurring alone or in combination: low functional bladder capacity and nocturnal polyuria. The multifactorial pathophysiology not only implies several possible targets for therapeutic intervention but also means that it is unlikely that one treatment modality including drugs will be successful in all patients. Drugs approved for the treatment of male LUTS and male and female OAB are known to be far more effective for treatment of the daytime symptoms than for nocturia. Summary Several pharmacological principles have been tested with varying success. The treatment of choice should depend upon the main underlying cause, thus aiming primarily to increase bladder capacity by counteracting detrusor overactivity and/or reducing nocturnal polyuria. Using current available agents, effective, personalized treatment should be designed taking into account gender, co-morbidities, and identified etiological factors. However, there is a medical need for new, approved drugs for treatments for patients with nocturia.
Original languageEnglish
Article number8
Number of pages7
JournalCurrent Urology Reports
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Global polyuria
  • Nocturnal polyuria
  • Reduced bladder capacity
  • Overactive bladder
  • Pharmacological principles
  • LOWER URINARY-TRACT
  • BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA
  • ORALLY DISINTEGRATING TABLET
  • PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL
  • DOUBLE-BLIND
  • OVERACTIVE BLADDER
  • MEDICAL-TREATMENT
  • PARALLEL-GROUP
  • SLEEP QUALITY
  • DESMOPRESSIN
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Nocturia/drug therapy
  • Polyuria/drug therapy
  • Female
  • Aged

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