Patient versus proxy-reported problematic activities of daily life in patients with COPD

Nienke Nakken*, Daisy J. A. Janssen, Esther H. A. van den Bogaart, Monique van Vliet, Geeuwke J. de Vries, Gerben P. Bootsma, Michiel H. M. Gronenschild, Jeannet M. L. Delbressine, Jean W. M. Muris, Emiel F. M. Wouters, Martijn A. Spruit

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

19 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background and objective: Loved ones (proxies) of patients with COPD are confronted with the patients' limitations in activities of daily living (ADLs). However, it remains unknown whether proxies are able to correctly estimate the problematic ADLs of the patient. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the level of agreement between patient-reported and proxy-reported problematic ADLs of the patient.

Methods: Stable outpatients with moderate to very severe COPD (n = 194) and their resident proxies (n = 194) were included in this cross-sectional study. Patients' problematic ADLs were assessed in the domains 'self-care', 'mobility', 'productivity' and ;'leisure' using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) in both patients and resident proxies. Furthermore, the perceived performance and satisfaction for important problematic ADLs were rated on a 10-point scale.

Results: In total, 830 problematic ADLs were reported by patients, and 735 by proxies. Agreement in reporting problematic ADLs within a domain was poor (productivity and leisure; kappa = 0.20 and 0.16, respectively) to fair (self-care and mobility; kappa = 0.32 and 0.22, respectively). Similar performance and satisfaction scores, for equally reported problematic ADLs, were given by 24.0% and 17.6% of the pairs, respectively.

Conclusion: Proxies were often not able to identify the patients' most important problematic ADLs. Moreover, when patient and proxy agreed about the presence of a specific problematic ADL, the perception of the performance and the satisfaction with that performance differed within most pairs. This emphasizes the importance of involving proxies, besides patients alone, in identifying patients' problematic ADLs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)307-314
Number of pages8
JournalRespirology
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2017

Keywords

  • activities of daily living
  • chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • family caregiver
  • occupational therapy
  • proxy
  • OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY-DISEASE
  • CHRONIC ORGAN FAILURE
  • FUNCTIONAL STATUS
  • MEASURE HEALTH
  • CARE
  • OUTCOMES
  • REHABILITATION
  • BEHAVIOR
  • INTERVENTIONS
  • PERCEPTIONS

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