Passive Facebook Usage Undermines Affective Well-Being: Experimental and Longitudinal Evidence

Philippe Verduyn*, David Seungjae Lee, Jiyoung Park, Holly Shablack, Ariana Orvell, Joseph Bayer, Oscar Ybarra, John Jonides, Ethan Kross

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

357 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Prior research indicates that Facebook usage predicts declines in subjective well-being over time. How does this come about? We examined this issue in 2 studies using experimental and field methods. In Study 1, cueing people in the laboratory to use Facebook passively (rather than actively) led to declines in affective well-being over time. Study 2 replicated these findings in the field using experience-sampling techniques. It also demonstrated how passive Facebook usage leads to declines in affective well-being: by increasing envy. Critically, the relationship between passive Facebook usage and changes in affective well-being remained significant when controlling for active Facebook use, non-Facebook online social network usage, and direct social interactions, highlighting the specificity of this result. These findings demonstrate that passive Facebook usage undermines affective well-being
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)480-488
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology-General
Volume144
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Facebook
  • social support
  • well-being
  • envy
  • online social networks
  • CONSEQUENCES
  • LONELINESS
  • DECREASE

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