Optimism, positive and negative affect, and goal adjustment strategies: their relationship to activity patterns in patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain

Rosa Esteve, Alicia E. Lopez-Martinez, Madelon L. Peters, Elena R. Serrano-Ibanez, Gema T. Ruiz-Parraga, Carmen Ramirez-Maestre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Objective. Activity patterns are the product of pain and of the self-regulation of current goals in the context of pain.) The aim of this study was to investigate the association between goal management strategies and activity patterns while taking into account the role of optimism/pessimism and positive/negative affect. Methods. Two hundred and thirty-seven patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain filled out questionnaires on optimism, positive and negative affect, pain intensity, and the activity patterns they employed in dealing with their pain. Questionnaires were also administered to assess their general goal management strategies: goal persistence, flexible goal adjustment, and disengagement and reengagement with goals. Results. Structural equation modelling showed that higher levels of optimism were related to persistence, flexible goal management, and commitment to new goals.) These strategies were associated with higher positive affect, persistence in finishing tasks despite pain, and infrequent avoidance behaviour in the presence or anticipation of pain. Conclusions.) The strategies used by the patients with chronic musculoskeletal pain to manage their life goals are related to their activity patterns.

Original languageEnglish
Article number6291719
Number of pages12
JournalPain research & management
Volume2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Mar 2018

Keywords

  • FEAR-AVOIDANCE MODEL
  • LIFE ORIENTATION TEST
  • DISPOSITIONAL OPTIMISM
  • SELF-REGULATION
  • FIT INDEXES
  • IMPLEMENTATION INTENTIONS
  • PERSONAL GOALS
  • DEPRESSED MOOD
  • PANAS SCALES
  • PURSUIT

Cite this