On the mediating effects of pregnancy and birth stress events on the relation between lateral preferences and cognitive functioning in healthy school-aged children

W. van der Elst, R. Wassenberg, C. Meijs, P. Hurks, M. van Boxtel, J. Jolles

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

If the pathological left-handedness theory is valid, left-handed people who also experienced pregnancy and birth stress events (PBSEs) would especially be expected to deviate from the cognitive norm (rather than left-handers in general). This hypothesis was tested in a large sample of healthy children (aged 6.6-15.9 years). Multiple cognitive abilities were assessed, including verbal fluency and working memory. Children with a left lateral preference who also experienced a PBSE did not deviate from the cognitive norm. Age was positively associated with all cognitive measures, and mean level of parental education strongly affected verbal fluency functioning.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)548-558
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Pathological left-handedness theory
  • Hand preference
  • Foot preference
  • Strength of lateral preferences
  • Cognition
  • School-aged children
  • LEFT-HANDEDNESS
  • HAND PREFERENCE
  • OBSTETRIC COMPLICATIONS
  • SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS
  • EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONS
  • SWITCH HISTORY
  • LANGUAGE
  • PERFORMANCE
  • SAMPLE
  • SIDE

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